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View Full Version : attn: Maine Cat 30 owners re: SAIL Magazine story inquiry



SailMagazine
13th May 2013, 09:39 PM
Hi Maine Cat 30 owners,
My name is Becca Oken, and I'm a writer at SAIL Magazine. For our August issue, we're doing a story about the top 13 cruisers under 30 feet, including the Maine Cat 30. We're featuring short (300-word) contributions from owners of "pocket cruisers" about why they love their boats, along with specs and photos of the boats and their owners. If you're interested in contributing and writing something briefly about your boat, please let me know, and I can send some questions to answer. My deadline is May 20.

Let me know if you have any questions, and I look forward to seeing some responses! Thanks!

-Becca

HappyEnding
14th May 2013, 01:39 PM
I thought a pocket cruiser was considered a trailerable boat that you could cruise on? Just curious why you would pick a MC30 only vs say a Endeavourcat 30 or the most popular Gemini series?

Tropic Cat
14th May 2013, 02:14 PM
I thought a pocket cruiser was considered a trailerable boat that you could cruise on? Just curious why you would pick a MC30 only vs say a Endeavourcat 30 or the most popular Gemini series?

I PM'd her and mentioned Catalacs as well. I didn't hear back ... so apparently the editorial decision has already been made.

The Catalac 8M and 9M .. Iroquois 30, Prout 31, Hirondelle 24, Lerouge 31, Tomcat 28, Intercat 1500, PDQ 32, Americat 30, Endeavourcat 30 and Geminis don't exist and Maine Cat gets the spotlight. Although if a 30 foot boat LOA is their cutoff, then at least the Hirondelle, Americat, Intercat , Endeavourcat 30, Iroquois 30, Catalac 8M and Catalac 9M should be included.

Most of these boats have good write ups that can be found here.

Pocket Catamarans for sale by owner (http://www.catamaransite.com/catamarans_for_sale_less_than_38.html)

Hmmm...what if they are only including American made boats? Then where's the Gemini, Endeavourcat, Intercat, Tomcat or Americat?

It's early yet, I probably left one or two off this list. Boat owners, please don't be offended, it's just my early stage Alzheimer acting up. Feel free to expand this list.

SailMagazine
14th May 2013, 04:07 PM
Thanks for your responses and interest! I just replied to your private message, Rick. SAIL's editors have come up with a list of pocket cruisers we're featuring in the story, and Maine Cat 30 happens to be on the list. So I came to this forum to reach out to owners, as I've been doing with the other boats on the list.

Hope this clears some things up! Thanks again for your replies!

Sandy Daugherty
14th May 2013, 04:42 PM
from Sandy's Plain English Dictionary:

Editor: A self-proclaimed Omniscient locked in an uptown office with a corner office view of other corner offices, whose bottom line is magazine sales because they govern advertising revenue which governs his or her job security. See also Grocery Chain Mentality.

Like their advertising customers, Editors believe boats have an eighteen month shelf life. Since defunct manufacturers don't advertise, promoting defunct products does not enhance job security. Justifying the purchase or retention of expired product does not enhance job security. Promoting current production does promote advertising, if not by the boat builder then by all the manufacturers of stuff the boat builder buys to build boats.

Boating editors don't have time to boat; they just skim other boating magazines and catalog the ads. They don't even consult Wikipedia. That is written by writers. Writers are commodity. Editors are Salaried, with pensions and health plans. Most writers have daytime jobs, preferably not in the Marine Industry.

FSMike
15th May 2013, 01:25 AM
from Sandy's Plain English Dictionary:

Editor: A self-proclaimed Omniscient locked in an uptown office with a corner office view of other corner offices, whose bottom line is magazine sales because they govern advertising revenue which governs his or her job security. See also Grocery Chain Mentality.

Like their advertising customers, Editors believe boats have an eighteen month shelf life. Since defunct manufacturers don't advertise, promoting defunct products does not enhance job security. Justifying the purchase or retention of expired product does not enhance job security. Promoting current production does promote advertising, if not by the boat builder then by all the manufacturers of stuff the boat builder buys to build boats.

Boating editors don't have time to boat; they just skim other boating magazines and catalog the ads. They don't even consult Wikipedia. That is written by writers. Writers are commodity. Editors are Salaried, with pensions and health plans. Most writers have daytime jobs, preferably not in the Marine Industry.

Sandy -
All that because a magazine is planning on mentioning a Maine Cat in a story? Or did you just get up on the wrong side of the berth this AM?

dmmbruce
15th May 2013, 12:11 PM
Sandy -
All that because a magazine is planning on mentioning a Maine Cat in a story? Or did you just get up on the wrong side of the berth this AM?

Yes, but didn't Sandy do an excellent job of his short diatribe!

:)

Mike

Tropic Cat
15th May 2013, 02:25 PM
Sandy made a great point which is probably correct. Given a choice of 3 boats currently in production which are around 30 feet, how did they manage to select the one boat that doesn't have an enclosed bridge deck and call it a pocket cruising catamaran?

Given the 3, I would have selected the Tomcat, as at least it keeps the rain off. As an aside if I was running Hunter Marine or Performance cruising, I'd be lobbying these guys hard.....

Sandy Daugherty
15th May 2013, 03:50 PM
"All that because a magazine is planning on mentioning a Maine Cat in a story? Or did you just get up on the wrong side of the berth this AM?"

No, FSMike. I like Maine Cats. I like Becca Oken. There are probably one or two Editors I might like. This is about short, fluffy magazine stories ordered by mentally short, fluffy magazine editors who want 600 words and three cute pictures to separate two half page ads about marine coatings and color-coordinated instrument packages.

We don't bash anyone's boat here, not even Tropic Cat...

Sandy Daugherty
15th May 2013, 03:56 PM
p.s. Google Becca Oken. You'll like her too!

victor
15th May 2013, 04:08 PM
from Sandy's Plain English Dictionary:

Editor: A self-proclaimed Omniscient locked in an uptown office with a corner office view of other corner offices, whose bottom line is magazine sales because they govern advertising revenue which governs his or her job security. See also Grocery Chain Mentality.

Like their advertising customers, Editors believe boats have an eighteen month shelf life. Since defunct manufacturers don't advertise, promoting defunct products does not enhance job security. Justifying the purchase or retention of expired product does not enhance job security. Promoting current production does promote advertising, if not by the boat builder then by all the manufacturers of stuff the boat builder buys to build boats.

Boating editors don't have time to boat; they just skim other boating magazines and catalog the ads. They don't even consult Wikipedia. That is written by writers. Writers are commodity. Editors are Salaried, with pensions and health plans. Most writers have daytime jobs, preferably not in the Marine Industry.

Yes Sandy , I agree but lets look at the up side; less than 10 years ago you wouldn't even see a multihull story or advert in sail mag. Our breed of sailing vessel is making an impact on the whole industry the good
and bad features. We're getting the notice we rightfully deserve. More acceptance of our vessel choices equates to a bigger customer base bringing more choices and a stronger resale price. lets not forget where we came from.

Tropic Cat
15th May 2013, 05:12 PM
"...We don't bash anyone's boat here, not even Tropic Cat...

Looking forward to your diatribe on this subject.....

HappyEnding
16th May 2013, 02:14 AM
I think we all realize the true reason, that is the only Cat asked for, though to me it doesn't really fit into a pocket nor cruiser catagory, any more than stilletto would be,

I like MC also but dont feel they constitute a cruiser

searenitysail
16th May 2013, 02:50 AM
The way I look at it is that every time a mainstream sailing magazine does a story on any multihulls, it only helps our boats to maintain their value!:)

No doubt, some of the negative comments are justified but I think we should encourage any articles that promotes "multi-thinking" rather than "single-minded" thinking!

Marshall

Talbot
16th May 2013, 07:46 AM
It befalls all us true boat owners to try to get decent articles published in the magazines.

I reckon I have done my share - encouraged three separate articles about my old Catalac 9m in the Practical Boat Owner, and a picture of my old boat was also included in an article by the esteemed Mr Woods on multihulls.

gholmes
16th May 2013, 05:03 PM
Yes Sandy , I agree but lets look at the up side; less than 10 years ago you wouldn't even see a multihull story or advert in sail mag. Our breed of sailing vessel is making an impact on the whole industry the good
and bad features. We're getting the notice we rightfully deserve. More acceptance of our vessel choices equates to a bigger customer base bringing more choices and a stronger resale price. lets not forget where we came from.

I have heard that the publisher of Sail Magazine is coming out with a multihull version of Sail magazine this fall...

Sandy Daugherty
16th May 2013, 05:33 PM
Thanks Gholmes! that is good news!
Re: Catalac diatribe: none forthcoming. I may not agree with what you love but I will defend your right to love it!

NEW CONCERN: Do we really want to encourage rampant multihullism? Count the number of cat-sized slips in your harbor. Are any of them vacant? What do you think will happen if there are twice as many of us! Think about what marinas will charge for such a rare commodity. Ditto for travelifts and land storage. It scares me.

searenitysail
17th May 2013, 12:47 AM
...NEW CONCERN: Do we really want to encourage rampant multihullism? Count the number of cat-sized slips in your harbor. Are any of them vacant? What do you think will happen if there are twice as many of us! Think about what marinas will charge for such a rare commodity. Ditto for travelifts and land storage. It scares me.


Sandy,

Excellent point--maybe we better leave the single-minded sailors to themselves!

Case in point: Cherry Grove is a well-known, traditionally gay community on Fire Island barrier beach on the south shore of Long Island, NY. The populace enjoyed their reputation and their lifestyle, and in fact flaunted it to some extent.

As the gay lifestyle became more accepted by the general population, hetero***uals realized that some real bargains existed on the beach and began to purchase and rent homes in "the Grove."

Kind of pissed off the Cherry Grove gay community somewhat, as home prices and rental rates rose and homes for sale or rent became more scarce.:)

I guess that's the price of acceptance--is that what we really want?:D

Marshall

rgesner
17th May 2013, 06:26 AM
I have heard that the publisher of Sail Magazine is coming out with a multihull version of Sail magazine this fall...

I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that it is not a monthly (at least to start with), but at least it is a start :)

On another promising note, the current (June) edition of Cruising Worlld is focused on Catamarans, with both covers and roughly and equal amout of cat-centric article-pages as mono-centric article-pages (with the rest being agnostic). The advertisements seem to he pretty well balanced between cats and monos as well, with advertisers surely influences by the editorial content and/or vice-versa.

I think catamarans have reached critical mass, and there is no stopping now... :)

(Ps, We only have a small mono because we're saving our money for a big cat :P )

- Rusty

Michael K
17th May 2013, 02:12 PM
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t617/Sendtomike/bth_dscn8758_zps3fb5d007.jpg

As Sandy points out editorial bias oh so well, my 30' "poor man's Mainecat 30" would never pass muster. But it cost a fraction of what an MC 30 does, and that is certainly one reason why I love it. :D

Sandy Daugherty
17th May 2013, 05:02 PM
Mea Culpa! I should not have hijacked this thread. MC 30 Owners everywhere, and even MC 30 riders should tell Becca about their experiences, particularly about cruising!

Hi Michael K! is that Hot Mustard?

Sandy Daugherty
17th May 2013, 05:45 PM
Hi Becca!

My experience with the MC 30 is limited to rides at Demo Days after the Annapolis Boat Show. In Brief:

The open bridge deck makes the boat feel much bigger than 30'. The visibility from the helm is the best I've seen since my Hobie Cat days, when at times I would have wished for a lot less intimate contact with the surroundings. It feels safe.

The narrow beams make the cat penetrate seas with a lot less hobby-horsing than say a Catalina 30, in spite of the Catalina's pendulous ballast. The light loading makes for better buoyancy in the bows which makes it less likely that green water will declutter the decks

The Maine Cat's sailing performance is remarkable, especially compared to all of the shoal draft. low aspect ratio keeled cats "from the past."

I'm happy to report that I've heard of no broken dagger boards, but there must have been one or two. These are an essential element of the MC 30's attraction. Board down they go to weather with deep keeled monohulls, board up they enjoy the wonders of many shallow anchorages. In fact The Chesapeake bay is almost twice as big for them as for a fixed keel vessel drawing 4 to 5 feet.

Let's consider practical usage. It's a three day weekend, and contrary to the weather forecast its pouring rain, there are two couples aboard and we're stuck at the anchorage. Are we miserable, huddled in the cabin of a monohull, or are we free to move about, or even dance in the cockpit? Even more amazing, there's considerable privacy if we want it.

Better yet, we could raise sail, continue our trip, and stay dry! Try that in a McGregor my friends!

But there are two downsides to Maine Cat Ownership; it ain't cheap, and you can't tow it home. A catamaran costs twice as much as a halfamaran, and (thankfully) can't be derigged, cranked up on a trailer, demasted, and hauled back to the house behind a larger than otherwise necessary family vehicle. You can sail further in a catamaran, and come home a lot less hot, tired, and dirty. You might even have some energy left for those honey-do's. (yeah. right.)

No, I'm not saying that with a catamaran you run with a better class of people; they just have better credit. And they smell better.

Michael K
17th May 2013, 09:19 PM
Hi Sandy,

Yes, it is. But since repainting the topsides last Fall it isn't quite as obvious. Since then, a friend has suggested a new name: Tabula Rasa.

Hi Michael K! is that Hot Mustard?[/quote]

Mark424
20th May 2013, 10:15 PM
Lots of Maine Cat owners here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Mecats/

boatsmith
21st May 2013, 07:09 PM
Becca also contacted us for a small Tiki info. I think the Maine Cat is a great boat.

Mark424
23rd May 2013, 06:40 PM
Hi Becca,

Iím not an owner, but have been trying to buy one for 6 months or so, in both instances the owners decided not to sell. I have been out for day sails twice, there are numerous stories about people spending extended stays in the Bahamas on these boats. Here is my rationale for what differentiates this boat from the others.

Itís all about the cockpit. Simply put, the Maine Cat 30 has the best cockpit of any mono under 50í and most other cats. Whether day sailing with friends or cruising for a weekend or weeks, I want to spend time in the cockpit, not chained to the helm, not down below. I want to be able see forward from all points in the cockpit, most cats have you looking at the back of the house or sitting at a helm away from your friends. Most monos, the best seat in the cockpit is facing backwards. So Cal can have cool weather year round, I want to be able to close up, the 360 enclosure of the MC30 is great for year round sailing.

Maintenance Cost: Yes, itís an expensive boat, but itís well built, the systems are simple and sufficient, and the cost of ownership should be well below average.

Performance: Itís not a speed daemon. But without all that lead hanging underneath you and a wide waterline, you can get a thrill sailing at 10-12 from time to time if the wind really pipes up.

The Seawind 1000 is the only thing that has similar attributes, and it's quite a bit more expensive.