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YoungGrumpy
24th September 2013, 10:47 PM
The good news in the order of coming:
The trailer worked out just fine for the trip and assembly.
The crane/hoist was used to pick the Cat from the trailer and lower into the water (with abot 5 inches to spare both vertically and horizontally).
The boat holds water outside, tiller/rudder works, outboard start and runs as a clock. (Easily makes 7 knots under power).
The mast stays the right way up, new stays where sized ok.
Now the problems and issues.
As the center console was stripped of all the hardware, some replacements Iíve got for the assortment of dirty, broken and just old stuff are still waiting to be installed. And what I see is,
There is no obvious way to tension the halyards. The two winches in the rear part of the center console could not be used, as there is not any blocks or leads from the mast aft (the only contraptions at the mast are 4 deck type cleats, two per side). There are two blocks (left and right corner) at the aft beam, which, I figure, could be used to trim the big jib or spinnaker sheets by bringing it to the one of the winches.
What I need is,
- turning blocks at the lower mast end to route the halyards aft to the center console winch or, could it be just a winch at the mast?
- Properly positioned cleats for the mast rotation bar (is there a proper term for this piece of rope?)
- A pair of blocks leading conveniently to a winch (winches) for the jib sheet (100% non-overlapping jib)
- Attachment point for the Cunningham/main downhaul.
What works but not perfectly well is the replacement boom (being a bit too long, it keeps the mainsheet tackle attachment point like, 3 ft behind the boat, and the angle for the exiting line make it hard to cleat. Plus, the combined friction in the tackle looks like will be less than perfect for releasing in light wind, I will see).
And this is before the reefing for the main is considered.
Any advice, comments and or pics are very much appreciated.

YoungGrumpy
2nd December 2013, 10:19 PM
Hey,
Come on, guys,
summer is over, help me out here for the next summer!
The boat is out of the water, and I can say with some confidence, I've figured out the crane/trailer part.
Not so good was the sailing. I actually had the cat sailed like, 3 times (the whole purpose was more to get her off the trailer, so I can fix some rusty spots, and see if anything major needs work).
After motoring off the mooring and raising the sails I've managed to get the cat moving (easily went by the Hunter 38 going same tack) right till the point where we had to tack. And spend 15 min in the irons, going with the current.
An hour later I've figured how to get it back moving on the same tack. Turning into the wind, however, eluded me this year.

ggray
3rd December 2013, 01:29 AM
Can't help you with your rigging details, but WRT successful tacking, I realised the boat went to weather better, and passed through irons better when the boom is sheeted close to the centerline. This requires the traveller to be positioned above the centerline.

Of course, in higher winds, you might need to depower, so the traveller might need to be at a lower position until it is time to tack.

Peter
3rd December 2013, 05:36 AM
Hey,
Come on, guys,
summer is over, help me out here for the next summer!
The boat is out of the water, and I can say with some confidence, I've figured out the crane/trailer part.
Not so good was the sailing. I actually had the cat sailed like, 3 times (the whole purpose was more to get her off the trailer, so I can fix some rusty spots, and see if anything major needs work).
After motoring off the mooring and raising the sails I've managed to get the cat moving (easily went by the Hunter 38 going same tack) right till the point where we had to tack. And spend 15 min in the irons, going with the current.
An hour later I've figured how to get it back moving on the same tack. Turning into the wind, however, eluded me this year.

Small light cats do not carry their way very well and stop as soon as the wind stops working on the sails.

So simple rules to tack a small light cat.

1. Bear away to increase speed. (don't go mad 10 degrees should be fine), but you must attain a good speed through the water.
2. Put tiller across positively (no hesitation).
3. Release main sheet (if you keep it sheeted in the boat will weather cock and you will be in irons, guess you already worked that out).
4. Wait until boat is through the wind and as the jib just begins to back, release the jib sheet.
5. Sheet in the opposite jib sheet (tight)
6. Wait until the wind has filled the jib and then sheet in the main.
7. Take control of the tiller and steer to the correct heading.
8. Re-trim jib, mainsheet and traveller

You can experiment by letting the traveller down, before the tack, instead of releasing the mainsheet, and if locked off it will be above the CL ready for the other tack, but timing is much more critical, so to begin with put the traveller in the middle and use the mainsheet.

If you end up in irons reverse the helm (tiller the other way) the boat will sail backwards and the jib will back, once through the wind you can sort things out from there.

YoungGrumpy
5th December 2013, 10:56 PM
Thanks,
Unfortunately, I have to wait till spring to practise:(

Rasputin
6th December 2013, 10:46 PM
Do you need a winch to tension the main halyard on a 24' cat?

There doesn't seem to be any winches here. http://skatingrienks.com/Sea_Wind_Sails.htm

YoungGrumpy
7th December 2013, 02:00 PM
Are you asking me, or stating that, Rasputin?
What about here, http://skatingrienks.com/Sea_Wind.htm, the Pic of the mast step, the substantial block on the mast rotator arm with the line going aft, I assuming, to one of the winches?
The center console is different from the stock on this cat, with two winches on two sides. Do you know the boat/owner? From the pics, I would say, he does not use the winches for the mainsheet trim, but left/right configuration fir the Jib.

Zuffen
20th December 2013, 08:18 AM
The main on a 23 is small enough combined with the mechanical advantage of the blocks that a winch isn't needed unless you plan on racing the boat in heavy weather.

A full sized Genoa can be handled without a winch but it sure is easier with one.

The original layout had only 1 winch on the boat and that was only there for raising the mast. I've never raised the mast by the "factory" technique but I've seen video of it.

My boat is an old race boat and it has 6 winches! 2 for the main, so it could be winched from either side of the boat, 2 for the jib, I for the main outhaul and I for all halyards. The boat has stopping cleats for the halyards.

These were designed to be simple easily sailed boats that 2 people could rig and launch in 30 minutes. I can't ever see me doing that but that was the original intent.

gweatherburn
5th April 2015, 01:34 PM
Here is a link some of the original documents and info relating to the US production of the Seawind 24, construction details, sailing instructions, assembly instructions.
https://sites.google.com/site/grantwprojects/seawind

Sweeto1
7th January 2016, 08:13 AM
Hi guys i have just purchased a seawind 24 mk3 which is on a expanding trailer and i would like to know how to raise the mast the most effective way.

gweatherburn
8th January 2016, 03:31 AM
Hi guys i have just purchased a seawind 24 mk3 which is on a expanding trailer and i would like to know how to raise the mast the most effective way.

Please find original diagram and instructions attached. Use the mainsheet and boom as a jack pole.
I don't have written instructions as we used to demonstrate using a video of how to assemble the boat and have ready for sailing in about 15 minutes.
We produced the video because people would not believe that we could do it!

We had fun at boat ramps as we would gather onlookers who could not believe the speed of the process from arrival to launching - much of the time quicker that people faffing around with power boats.

Cheers

Grant