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Nordic
15th October 2008, 09:00 PM
Anyone out there have a link or footage of a proa shunting?

Alan

harryproa
16th October 2008, 04:38 AM
Anyone out there have a link or footage of a proa shunting?

Alan

G'day,

There are videos at http://www.wingo.com/proa/brown/video.html#video and http://www.harryproa.com/ShuntingVideo/Shunting.htm

The former shows why a jib on each end is a lousy option, particularly in a seaway or big breeze when it gets slower, harder and more dangerous.

The latter is also in light air, but the technique is exactly the same in stronger air. Note, there was not enough wind to blow the battens through in this video. The boat is only sailing on one mainsail (different one on each shunt), hence the slow speed.

regards,
Rob

catty
16th October 2008, 12:38 PM
G'day,

There are videos at http://www.wingo.com/proa/brown/video.html#video and http://www.harryproa.com/ShuntingVideo/Shunting.htm

The former shows why a jib on each end is a lousy option, particularly in a seaway or big breeze when it gets slower, harder and more dangerous.


regards,
Rob

And you would base this statement on what? rob. Russ and jezerro actually have many bluewater miles up while your creations have pretty much none.

harryproa
17th October 2008, 03:22 AM
G'day,

Thanks for the question. Always happy to explain proa stuff. Russ' boats were named Jzero and Jzerro.

I am not sure of the relevance of blue water miles to shunting ability, I suspect both Russ and I have done thousands of shunts in all types of conditions.

If you look at the videos, you wil see that the Pac proa involves standing on a narrow deck at the extreme end of the boat, lowering and unhanking the jib, carrying it the length of the boat to another narrow deck, hanking it back on, going back to the cockpit, hoisting it up and then winching the sheets on. Not shown is the hassle of lifting one rudder and lowering the other.

The harry shunt involves releasing two lightly loaded mainsheets, then sheeting on the new ones. The rudders autiomatically rotate to the new direction. Nobody has to move, and certainly nobody has to go out on the ends of the boat. On all recent harrys there is only one sheet, which makes it even easier and quicker.

One shunt takes a couple of minutes in a flat calm, much longer in a blow, needs at least 2 people and involves a lot of flapping sails and hard work. The other takes 7 seconds in a calm, maybe 20 seconds in a gale and is done solo with people on the boat not even realising a shunt has happened.

One is wet and very dangerous, the other is dry, safe and serene.

If that is not clear, let me know and I will explain it in more detail.

I believe you are in Queensland? If so, and if you can get to Brisbane in early December, perhaps we could meet, maybe have a look over Rare Bird and you can see a harry in the flesh.

regards,

Rob

Miamiproas
13th November 2008, 03:40 AM
There are two french proas - both pacific that shows somewherein youtube shunting
One is "Equilibre" in Martinique - 40 ft traditional no rudders - here is one his videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZgMWQAXFYw
this one shows shunting 1min 30 sec into the video as well as how sensitive you can steer a proa using mast rake, angle, sail position - up to a mooring
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hH8lv0_CYxA&feature=channel
the other proa is more like Russ Brown - but a bog old proa sailing in tough weather
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj_WmFFESWQ&feature=related
you can see all his other videos and get a sense why a proa is so fast

I do have a small 21 ft proa with a crab claw and could film a video of a shunt - depending on your rig and how big your proa is - it can take up to a minute or as little as 15 seconds

Freetime
14th August 2009, 11:29 PM
Anyone out there have a link or footage of a proa shunting?

Alan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TzWS4P4_fMg&feature=channel_page:D

Find it on a link at sailinganarchy´s multihullforum....

joakim

multihullsailor6
15th August 2009, 10:20 AM
Thanks for that link, Joakim - very impressive of how easy and fast this model of a Harryproa shunts, seems shunting with a Dynarig is even easier than shunting with an Easyrig or a twin-masted twin-boom rig (Rob Denney calls it "schooner rig"?).

jkd
15th August 2009, 02:25 PM
SQ (stupid question)
This is cool, but why design to do it? Do proa's not tack or jibe worth a hoot?

John

multihullsailor6
15th August 2009, 04:42 PM
SQ (stupid question)
This is cool, but why design to do it? Do proa's not tack or jibe worth a hoot?

John

John, I have to agree with you (in a positive mindframe) - that is a SQ, actually a VSQ!:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

By design a proa will always have the same hull to leeward and is intended to travel in both directions, look at the design of the hulls, hence the mast is in the middle of the boat. Tacking on a proa is called shunting, jibing is only done by misadventure.

When shunting a proa equipped with a normal mast and boom (unlike the Dyna Rig), the boom swings to leeward before being hauled in again on the other boat's side and you travel in the opposite direction.

The Dyna Rig operates differently as seen in the video clip.

A nice drawing showing both mast designs in a shunt is shown on the HarryproaYahooGroup, but as that section is only open to members posting a link wouldn't work. Maybe Rob could post it?:cool:

jkd
17th August 2009, 02:38 PM
John, I have to agree with you (in a positive mindframe) - that is a SQ, actually a VSQ!:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

By design a proa will always have the same hull to leeward and is intended to travel in both directions, look at the design of the hulls, hence the mast is in the middle of the boat. Tacking on a proa is called shunting, jibing is only done by misadventure.

Allrighty then, I guess I will go do some homework. I had assumed these things were set up to run like an outrigger canoe.:o:)

John

harryproa
28th August 2009, 02:09 AM
A nice drawing showing both mast designs in a shunt is shown on the HarryproaYahooGroup, but as that section is only open to members posting a link wouldn't work. Maybe Rob could post it?:cool:

G'day,

There are some diagrams and movies at http://www.harryproa.com/ShuntingVideo/Shunting.htm

As well as being necessary on a proa, shunting is also far less likely to end in tears than tacking and gybing, particularly in big seas. This is because it is controllable and reversible at any stage.

regards,

rob

regards,

rob