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Thread: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

  1. #21

    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Good idea! Down with the half boats! Have owned a Solaris 42(12M) now for over 3 years. My last cat was a 9M Catalac. The Solars is a VERY sturdy boat. Have completely reworked the inside including total rewire of the DC system.
    New Yanmars with sail drives and Seahawk propellers. Any info I can pass on, will do.

    Jim
    Kiekkakalo

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Quote Originally Posted by islandsailor58 View Post
    Brad- I have a 1977 ketch, that needs extensive work. I just had a survey done, and it is pretty extensive. Gerhard

    We too have a ketch ris Solaris 42, Aeolus. We know of another in the caribean 'Solarquest'. We have done extensive interior work ie all new headliner.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    How can we get together a list of current Solaris owners?

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor and Jo View Post
    For years I searched for a Solaris 42 to buy and travelled to Gibraltar and Greece to view boats. As a result I've collected quite a few pictures and some printed details. Although we ended up buying a Prout and are now about to upgrade to something larger I still have a fondness for the Solaris 42, the Rolls Royce of cats in her day, and would be happy to share what I have with any lucky current owners. If anyone's interested e-mail me.

    Hi Trevor and Jo
    We too have some original specs for our Solaris 42 'Aeolus'. We are cruising on the US East coast and Bahamas at present but will look at scanning them when we are ashore. Where are you going to post them? We are new to multihulls4us so are trying to learn how to get back to threads etc.
    Pam and Jim Aboard Aeolus

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiekkakola View Post
    Good idea! Down with the half boats! Have owned a Solaris 42(12M) now for over 3 years. My last cat was a 9M Catalac. The Solars is a VERY sturdy boat. Have completely reworked the inside including total rewire of the DC system.
    New Yanmars with sail drives and Seahawk propellers. Any info I can pass on, will do.

    Jim
    Kiekkakalo

    Where are you and your boat? Name etc.
    Pam and Jim

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Hi Everyone
    I have been a catamaran addict for many years but tend to only like older British designs and have met many of the famous designers.
    I know that the older designs were perhaps too heavy or with too little bridgedeck clearance tend to slam going to windward but I find the modern option of high bridgedeck clearance has tended to make a sameness about designs which for me makes them less appealing. I also think it a mistake for builders to cater soley for the charter market building only large cats that few individuals could afford to own.
    Solaris used several designers for it's boats of the small catamarans the relatively modern and pretty looking boat was by Derek Kellsal the Solaris 24 was about as perfect in dimentions as possible with a high bridgedeck which didn't detract from her looks. The Sunstar was French design and the Solaris 42 an old Terry Compton design he also designed the Aristocat 30 which was later given a new lease of life by Tony Smith of Gemini performance cruising an Englishman based in the USA, Terry Compton also designed the Catfisher motor sailer catamaran. Southern star, your comment about the Ackerman principle on widely spaced rudders was the wrong way around, it's the inside hull that's rudder needs more angle the geometry is quite simple the inside hull in a sharp turn isn't going as far as the outside hull meaning a smaller radius so a sharper angle is needed. I couldn't get my heavenly twins to tack when I first owned her and was told to ignore the sails just concentrate on the helm with a positive and quick turn and the headsail still on the old tack will assist in making a good tack then reset the sails. It worked a treat after a bit of practice. I also read somewhere on this forum about a person wanting to change their solaris 42 from ketch to sloop rig, this should be relatively simple as there is a 42 on the market with a sloop rig main mast appears to be in the same position. Indeed the mainmast is quite tall I doubt if much structural work was done to convert from ketch to sloop.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Hello Nibby and welcome to the Solaris thread! I had to look back over previous posts to find my reference to the Ackerman effect and you are abolutely right - I had it backwards.

    In reference to tacking - I have had zero problems tacking my Sunstream 40 in winds varying from 4 to 40 knots - although there have certainly been reports of people having some difficulty with the ketch rigged 42's.
    Your experience with your Heavenly Twins - leaving the jib on the previous tack through the turn, has already been mentioned (aka - backwinding the jib); of course, this does tend to increase the chafe on the clew and the leech of the sail when it is finally allowed to snap over to the new tack. Nevertheless, when concerned about your ability to come about due to the state of the sea/winds, it is the wisest approach.
    In addition, of course, it is also generally wise to build up speed prior to the tack (even if it requires bearing-off briefly) and to let out the main prior to the tack, to avoid the 'weather-cocking' effect of a sheeted-in mainsail.

    Your preference for the older British cats is obviously shared by many others - although in fairness, I find many of the newer designs to be more attractive. Catamarans are, afterall, non-traditional sailing vessels and in my eyes, there is something very cool about the 'Millenium Falcom' like appearance to the more modern cats. Having said that, there are clear advantages to the lower freeboard on most of the older British cats - and easier boarding is only one of them. Furthermore, the flatter shapes of their coachouses permitted the use of tempered glass windows - the safest, clearest and most permanent material for fixed portlights (just read the various posts on the problems that many have had in attempting to replace the curved plastic windows on most of the more modern designs).

    To some extent, I see the older British cats as two-hulled versions of the more traditional monohulls that many still prefer for an offshore boat (i.e., boats with a full or long keel, heavier displacement, solid construction and more heavily stayed rig, narrower beam, smaller and deeper cockpits, lower freeboard, front overhang): both boats make some sacrifices in ultimate performance and pointing ability in exchange for some real-world advantages:

    - increased displacement increases resistance to capsize;
    - increased displacement means that there is relatively less impact in carrying additional gear/stores for extended cruising;
    - more heavy/solid construction reduces stress cracks which are not only unsightly, but increase the risk of water intrusion into the core and resulting delamination; it also typically provides a more solid base for stanchions;
    - more heavy/solid construction leads to not only an increased sense of security, but easier/safer haulouts and beaching for maintenance (typically, the old British Cats can simply be dropped on some 2x6's, whereas most newer cats require multiple jackstands under the bridgedeck to prevent flex and seized interior doors);
    - the heavy, low-tech construction also leads to easier/cheaper/lower tech repairs, should such be necessary; this can be particularly important when sailing in the third-world, or for the DIY crowd;
    - front overhang leads not only to a drier foredeck, it also reduces the risk of burying the bows: the volume of the bows increases on three, rather than merely two planes, as the bows start to submerge;
    - lower freeboard makes for easier boarding and deboarding (and improves safety when the need arises to get off the boat quickly when docking);
    - lower freeboard also reduces windage, which assists in tacking, motoring into headwinds and in reducing the effect of wind when under anchor;
    - narrower beam makes it easier to find docking (and often at a price no more than for a monohull);
    - narrower beam reduces the risk of pitchpoling - which in the view of many, is a greater risk in a cat than capsize in various conditions; and, while it also reduces resistance to capsize, that is compensated for by various other aspects of the design/construction: the typically lower CE of the sailplan, the lower CG of the boat brought about by lower bridgedecks, galleys-down and, as aforementioned, the increased overall displacement;
    - smaller/higher-sided cockpits provide more protection and reduce the risk of being thrown in heavy seas;
    - the full bow pulpit on most older British Cats may add weight (and detract from appearance), but it provides much more safety when going forward to repair a jambed furler/change sails, for spinnaker sets, or to reset an anchor in heavy conditions;
    - ditto for solid foredecks or, as on many Solaris cats, a solid walkway between two smaller tramps (which may be the ideal compromise in terms reduced weight and pounding versus safety);
    - stanchions that are higher than on many newer boats (typically 30 inches rather than 24), also provide additional security when underway, again at the expense of appearance and increased weight;
    - the so called 'Prout rig', as also used on the Solaris Sunstream 40, provides a dedicated staysail stay for a staysail/storm jib, a huge advantage in heavy air; it also gives the sailplan a lower CE, thereby reducing the risk of capsize; it also allows the mast to be stepped at the strongest point of the boat, the companionway bulkhead, where all lines can be led to the cockpit without the need for turning blocks, etc.;
    - the lack of flat-top/big roach mainsails may reduce sail area and ultimate performance, but it enables the use of backstays and aft shrouds that can be mounted further forward. This makes for a stronger rig, reduces headstay sag and allows the main to be let out further when sailing downwind;
    - less curvature on the coachouse may be less attractive (at least in my eyes), but it permits the use of tempered glass fixed windows which will never haze and never need replacing; the lack of curvature also tends to provide a surer footing when one is required to go to the mast;
    - the lack of large, sliding-glass companionway doors provides additional security in the case of following seas; it also permits safer use of a series-drogue;
    - the typical galley-down arrangement puts the heaviest part of the accomodation precisely where it should be for stability - lower in the boat (thereby lowering the CG). It also typically provides for greater counter area, storage and, in heavy seas, a more secure setting where one is wedged in between counters. Admittedly, it is less 'cockpit friendly' when under anchor/sailing in light air/seas, but which is more important in an offshore cruising boat? Furthermore, the design of most older British cats leaves an opening between the galley and the saloon that still enables the cook to socialize.
    - the galley-down arrangement also provides additional space in the main saloon for lounging and for a proper chart table/nav station - near the cockpit, where it should be on an offshore cruiser. Contrast that with many of the newer, galley-up cats under 40 feet, where the chart table is so small as to be virtually unusable;
    - the smaller number of head compartments in the typical older British cat may be less 'charter-firendly', but it enables space to be used for things that are more important for the liveaboard couple/family with occasional guests. For example, I have a proper wet locker at the base of the steps to the port hull, only a few feet from the companionway door; I also have, in addition to 2 head compartments, a separate shower compartment with a bath-tub (this keeps the moisture/dampness that is generated by the shower where it belongs - in the shower and out of the head compartments). I also have the space for a 12' long galley which permits both a front-load and top-load refrigeration unit.

    So yes, in my opinion the older British catamarans are very similar to the more traditional, heavier monohulls that are still preferred by many for offshore cruising: all boats are compromises, but what they lose in speed potential and pointing ability, is offset by increases in strength, durability, safety and practicality.

    brad

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Many of those things are also better for living aboard. For instance, a charter cat may not need much space in the galley, since it's more of a floating hotel room. But for full-time living, more space, especially storage space, in the galley is important. Cockpit space for lounging and drinking is important on a charter cat, but you don't always have 8-10 people around your home unless you have a REALLY big family! A lightly built cat is OK for charter, where it will be returned to the base for maintainance every two weeks or so, but if it's your home---! "Nuf said!

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Can anyone help me out with a value of a Solaris 42?
    We have just had a survey,for insurance, results really good, but the surveyor says he cannot come up with a price higher that $30,000 US$ as that is what the last Solaris sold for. I see one for sale in Italy for 100,000 euro but he will not take that price as it isn't sold yet.
    Any Ideas?

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    The last couple of Solaris 42's I surveyed (both in 2005) were valued circa 75K.
    One was a '73 boat, lying Greece and the other, built '77, was in the UK and, I think, the only Mk.II built.
    Hope this helps.

  11. #31
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Thanks Tabs, Not sure how to prove to the surveyor the value. He is playing hardball about the $30,000 value unless I can show him proof of a boat which has sold for more. Is there as UK site which he can reference for the value based on surveyors or sales?

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Another thought :- Are you willing to speak to him or let him know your name , qualifications etc to confirm you have some knowledge of the value. He clearly doesn't and just relies on past sales.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Value is very difficult. So much depends upon condition and what people are prepared to pay. $30k sounds a bit low. I know of a couple of Solaris 42's which were recently advertised at around 40k (GBP 40k) and the vendors probably expect to receive a bit less than that. You could do far worse than ask Mark Jarvis of UK brokers Multihull World. I know he has experience of Solaris 42s. Hope that helps.

    Trevor.

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    PM me the contact for your surveyor and I'll send him the data.

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    To Svaeolus Re insurance value of solaris 42, strange to see the name of another friend of mine mentioned here Mark Jarvis Hi Mark it's Nibby.
    I don't see how a surveyor can put a general valuation on any boat $30,000 seems very low, any I have seen on the market in the Med are upwards of 100,000 euros but then again they must be vey late models or have been fully restored. If the boat is generally in good condition I would have thought the value should be about what you would have to pay to find another in similar condition, with there not being many around that should increase it's value? there is a Solaris 42 for sale in Cornwall at around 50,000 but a lot has been spent on it recently such as engines, sails, windows. I guess on what could be a 40 year old boat plus bank loans impossible to come by these days maybe you would never get your money back if restoring one? if I had a spare 50,000 I would definately consider the one in Cornwall but I cannot ever imagine having 100,000 to play with, if I did I am not sure that I would want to spend that much on a 40 year old boat, my partner certainly wouldn't like me spending that sort of money on any boat. Personally, I think the uniqueness of the Solaris 42 and I wasn't trying to sell I would accept the lower value as that would be reflected in premiums you need to pay, continue maintaining and upgrading yours maybe 2 or 3 years down the line the insurance value could be more realistic age of boats doesn't really effect the value it's the condition and level of equipment on board that really effects a boat valuation.
    Nibby

  16. #36
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Hi Nibby
    The trouble with going with such a low value with the insurance is that if ANYTHING happened the boat would be a rightoff, but yes I agree we would like the premiums. Our boat is in very good condition, infact we are on the hard at present doing our three year bottom maintenance. Check out our web page at solaris42.com

  17. #37

    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    I hear the Cornwall boat is optimistically priced at 50k. Apparently it was sold to the current owner at less than 40k, and that included new engines etc.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Hi Nibby, Did you checkout our web page? As you will see Aeolus is in very good condition plus has a lot of upgrades, new windows, headliner, radar, instruments etc etc. We are only looking for a value of $120,000 .

  19. #39
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Hi Svaeolus, I have viewed your website and agree that she is a lovely looking boat I too would be pretty hacked off at what the Surveyor valued her at. Maybe, you could take up this valuation issue with the association of marine surveyors as your surveyor would have to be a member of such a governing body to cover himself, if he missed something critically important on a boat survey and someone tried to sue him for professional negligence, he would need the backing of a professsional association of marine surveyors?
    Your boat does look a lot better than the one in Cornwall for sale at 50,000, but then again the climate here very quickly makes an otherwise lovely boat appear a bit unkempt it is so damp compared to Florida no boat stays clean or looking like new for very long even more so if she is nearer 40 years old.
    I will keep in touch as with a lot of luck I may be in a position later this year to make an offer on the solaris 42 in Cornwall.
    many thanks
    Nibby

  20. #40
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    Default Re: Solaris Owners of the world unite!

    Tabs
    Did you send Michael Cunningham the information. He is still focused on $30,00. His e-mail is seatrek58@aol.com or 772 321 2428. Not sure you if you received my PM. He never seem to reply to my e-mails so not sure how computer literate he is. Thanks for your help
    Pam

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