Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 48

Thread: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Hi all,

    We own a Maine Cat 41, hull #7. She is named TabbyCat, after our own gray tabby cat, Mercury (he chose to stay on shore).

    In any event, let's talk about the Maine Cat.

    We have lived aboard TabbyCat since taking delivery of her in September 2005. All in all, she continues to be a great boat for us.

    Here are a few things that we wanted and Maine Cat delivered.
    • Good visibility (we have 360 degrees of it) for both tall and short crew.

    • Protection from the sun/elements. The strataglass enclosure coupled with the hard top gives us a huge amount of flexibility. The strataglass panels can be individually rolled up/down for ventilation/protection. Of course, in the tropics this can create a bit of exercise as rain showers pass -- roll down/up, REPEAT.

    • Good sailing ability and able to tack easily. Beating is easy with the small self-tacking jib. Once we get off the wind a bit, we roll out the screacher and fly! She moves pretty well too - top speed = 18+, and it is not unusual for us to sail in the low teens.

      She can be single-handed as most lines are led into the cockpit, but she is also an easy boat to double hand and lets the crew really participate in the sailing.

    • Designed for 2 people to live on and 2 - 4 guests. With two queen sized berths, v-berth and the table converting to a queen, we have been able to handle all of our guests so far. The boat also offers pretty good storage and a fairly large galley (down on the port side).

    • Energy independence. With 4 solar panels and a large battery bank (1040 amp hours), we have a high degree of independence from marinas. We are adding a D400 wind generator to increase our "independence".

    • High quality construction, well thought out systems. She is pretty light and we can access everything.


    That's probably enough for now.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Brighton, UK
    Posts
    2,816

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    pictures please so that we can appreciate the comments better.
    Insanity is continuing to do the same thing and expecting different results

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Hmmm...I will have to work on that. We don't have a lot of pix that will illustrate - maybe I just need to write more descriptively

    Here are 4 shots. One of us underway in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, the next is TabbyCat at anchor in St. Augustine, FL, the 3rd is during a fun race in the Bahamas (we won!) and the last gives a good view of the bridgedeck clearance (31").
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Yoga O; 13th August 2009 at 09:18 PM. Reason: added a photo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Idaho, USA
    Posts
    189

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    I was sailing with a friend on his Corsair F27 up in the San Juans a week ago and in Friday Harbor I got a look at "Walking On Water", a Mainecat 41 in the flesh.
    WOW!!!!
    What a beautiful boat! It appeared WAY larger than I had imagined.
    I really want to sail one of these!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    On the boat, right now Costa Rica, Golfito
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    I like the thought of an open bridgedeck. Can you post some interior pics?......i2f

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    S.E. Florida
    Posts
    1,211

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    This may seem like a strange question but.... Do you ever feel that you are living in a fish bowl? You know, no privacy etc.
    I saw the Maine cat at a boat show a few years ago and thought it was neat to be able to take advantage of air flow comming from any direction or being able to just roll down the covers on the side the rain was blowing from and leave the others open but I'm not sure about having to go outside to get to the other hull.

    John
    "The floggings will continue until morale improves"!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Fishbowl - before taking delivery of the boat we worried about that a bit, so we ordered privacy screens. They are a white textilene fabric that zip into the Strataglass. We are the first MC41 to do this and they double as great sunshades.

    During the day, we can see out, but outsiders cannot see in. At night, with all the lights on full blast, we can't see out and outsiders can see shadows, but here's the thing we realized after living on the boat - - -

    Even in a marina with boats all around us, no one notices what you are doing. Sure, they might get interested briefly, especially if you are making a lot of noise, but people are involved in their own activities. In addition, when you really look at the sight lines, most of your body is out of sight due to the cockpit coaming.

    Once you are out cruising, it is even less of an issue as you quickly realize that there is naked activity going on outside the cockpit on other boats, and unless you are Bradjelina(?) or announcing a show on the net, you will not be noticed.

    So the short answer is (can anyone say, "Hey, it's the '70s!") - relax and do your own thing, everyone else will do theirs.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike
    (I2F - still looking for pictures)
    Last edited by Yoga O; 27th August 2009 at 11:47 PM. Reason: clarity?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Quote Originally Posted by solarbri View Post
    I was sailing with a friend on his Corsair F27 up in the San Juans a week ago and in Friday Harbor I got a look at "Walking On Water", a Mainecat 41 in the flesh.
    WOW!!!!
    What a beautiful boat! It appeared WAY larger than I had imagined.
    I really want to sail one of these!
    Thx - I will take that as a compliment! Walking on Water (WoW!) is hull #10. The owners live aboard in the PNW.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Quote Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
    I like the thought of an open bridgedeck. Can you post some interior pics?......i2f
    OK - here are a few, starting with a "panorama" taken in Grenada. We had 14 aboard for a snorkeling "excursion" - what a blast! Some of the Stratglass is up/some is down.
    Statues 092.jpg
    Next are two from our first overnight race (we were in full cruising trim and won the start!). You can see we had the Strataglass rolled up - it was HOT!
    Phil & Cindy - Gov Cup 2006.jpg
    Night in the cockpit - Gov Cup 2006.jpg

    Fair winds,
    Mike
    Last edited by Yoga O; 28th August 2009 at 12:19 AM. Reason: added a few more words

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    S.E. Florida
    Posts
    1,211

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoga O View Post
    Fishbowl - before taking delivery of the boat we worried about that a bit, so we ordered privacy screens. They are a white textilene fabric that zip into the Strataglass. We are the first MC41 to do this and they double as great sunshades.

    During the day, we can see out, but outsiders cannot see in. At night, with all the lights on full blast, we can't see out and outsiders can see shadows, but here's the thing we realized after living on the boat - - -

    Even in a marina with boats all around us, no one notices what you are doing. Sure, they might get interested briefly, especially if you are making a lot of noise, but people are involved in their own activities. In addition, when you really look at the sight lines, most of your body is out of sight due to the cockpit coaming.

    Once you are out cruising, it is even less of an issue as you quickly realize that there is naked activity going on outside the cockpit on other boats, and unless you are Bradjelina(?) or announcing a show on the net, you will not be noticed.

    So the short answer is (can anyone say, "Hey, it's the '70s!") - relax and do your own thing, everyone else will do theirs.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike
    (I2F - still looking for pictures)
    Ok, I can understand that and like the screen part. How about rain blow by? is it a hassle? Do you need to constantly mop up in your "living room"? Does it feel that you never really get out of the elements until you go below?
    Thank's for the input.

    John
    "The floggings will continue until morale improves"!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    John,

    The short answer is a resounding NO!

    We can be as closed or as open as we like. In torrential rain (at anchor or underway), we just have everything zipped and we are drier than a traditional bridgedeck salon type cat. In fact, we have seen lots of our traditional compatriots in foulies while we are still in shorts and tees.

    The longer answer is we do spend a lot of time rolling the Strataglass up when it's sunny and down when it's rainy. In the Carib this happens a lot! (That's why I have calluses on my knees, really!)

    Yes, if we leave the Strataglass rolled up and are away from the boat it will rain (guaranteed!) and the cockpit can get wet. But, it is designed to get wet so the water runs out the scuppers, the open cell cushions dry and life goes on.

    We spend most of our time in the "living room". We go below to cook, sleep, or to watch a movie in bed (among other things...)

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

    Here are a few more cockpit pix. One is from the ICW in the Fall of '06. You can just see a privacy screen rolled down on the starboard quarter. The sun is heating up the cockpit a bit on a cool day.

    The other shows the front windows rolled up and the sides down.
    DSC00836.jpg

    Aunt Sue & George - SC 2006.jpg

  12. #12
    TYRNTLZRDKING Guest

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Yoga O,

    I have always liked the open bridgedeck on the Maine Cats.
    The Maine Cat 30 is more in my range.
    Have you been out in high winds? 50 mph or more?
    Do the windows stay in place OK?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Quote Originally Posted by tyrntlzrdking View Post
    Yoga O,

    I have always liked the open bridgedeck on the Maine Cats.
    The Maine Cat 30 is more in my range.
    Have you been out in high winds? 50 mph or more?
    Do the windows stay in place OK?
    Yes...we have had multiple days of 40+ knot winds and a couple of squalls w/winds over 60. Windows have handled this with no hint of problem. Of course, this could change as the sunbrella "frames" age, but we hope to notice signs of aging and replace the windows first!

    The biggest concern is with breaking waves in a storm. Our experience so far has been limited to large amounts of water running up the deck and then into the windows. Again, they have held up fine to this abuse. Note that some water does squirt through the openings when water boards (no, I am not talking enhanced interrogation techniques!), but in stormy conditions we have the cockpit cleared for action.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    S.E. Florida
    Posts
    1,211

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    It sounds like the bridge deck stays at lot dryer than I had imagined, very nice. The layout sure does give you a couple of acres of space to use.

    Looking forward to the additional photo's when you get a chance.

    John
    "The floggings will continue until morale improves"!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoga O View Post
    • Good sailing ability and able to tack easily. Beating is easy with the small self-tacking jib. Once we get off the wind a bit, we roll out the screacher and fly! She moves pretty well too - top speed = 18+, and it is not unusual for us to sail in the low teens.
    Lots of boats will move in a blow, how does she handle in 5-10knots of breeze (upwind or down)?

    With the lightweight construction, how is the sound/vibration from the engines under power? What's your long range powering speed & fuel consumption with one engine when the boat is loaded? Two parts of passagemaking are having enough efficiency & fuel to get through the dead air at a reasonable clip, and handling the rough stuff.

    The combination of reasonable performance, quality, and a bit of minimalism is quite appealing. What is the headroom under the hard top and in the hulls? I think it says in the specs max height is 6'9" in the hulls, but with the curved roof, does it get short in the galley, office, heads? I'm 6'5", many of the older fast french boats max at 6'1 in the salon.

    Many Thanks.

    Mark
    Marina del Rey, CA

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark424 View Post
    Lots of boats will move in a blow, how does she handle in 5-10knots of breeze (upwind or down)?

    With the lightweight construction, how is the sound/vibration from the engines under power? What's your long range powering speed & fuel consumption with one engine when the boat is loaded? Two parts of passagemaking are having enough efficiency & fuel to get through the dead air at a reasonable clip, and handling the rough stuff.

    The combination of reasonable performance, quality, and a bit of minimalism is quite appealing. What is the headroom under the hard top and in the hulls? I think it says in the specs max height is 6'9" in the hulls, but with the curved roof, does it get short in the galley, office, heads? I'm 6'5", many of the older fast french boats max at 6'1 in the salon.

    Many Thanks.

    Mark
    Marina del Rey, CA
    Mark,

    Thanks for the questions - let's try and take your points one by one:

    Performance in 5 - 10 knots: Like almost any production fibreglass boat produced in the latter half of the latter half of the last century (and the first bit of this one), she really struts her stuff in 15 - 20. That said, we spent our first year on the Chesapeake Bay - notorious for light winds in July and August, and she does move in 5 - 10 apparent. We sailed a lot in light winds and loved it since we were just getting to know the boat.

    If you want to enjoy a light wind sail in these conditions, she will move @ 3 - 8 knots respectively. If you are off the wind by 60 degrees - 120 degrees, we roll out the screacher and she begins to create her own wind. If you are trying to get somewhere like we typically do when cruising, you will probably turn on the iron jenny.

    How is the sound/vibration from the engines?: The engines (Yanmar 27 - 30HP) are located in compartments that are isolated and sound dampened from the rest of the boat. Fairly quiet and vibration free is how I would put it. We have slept with the engines running. Yes, you know the engines are running, but it doesn't drive us crazy (we already ARE!). Of course our previous boat had a two cylinder Yanny where you could not hear (period!) the other person w/o shouting.

    Fuel consumption and speed fully loaded for cruising?: The most recent stats were our 9 day passage from Beaufort to the BVIs. Running @ 2800 rpms:

    consumption = approx .75 gals/hr
    speed = approx 6 knots

    We traveled with about 120 gals (96 in 3 internal tanks, 24 in jerry cans), and I figured we would be screwed if we had to travel more than 800 nm in dead calm.

    Headroom (and Bedroom): I am just over 6' 2", so this was a big one for us. The only placed I almost ALWAYS hit my head is going forward into the office. Just forward of the large hatch, the deck really slopes down - OUCH! Two minutes later, I will do the same thing - DAMN - why can't I remember to duck! Otherwise the headroom is great for me. I think the boat is actually built with 6' 7" headroom, so @ 6' 5" you might also have a bit of an issue in the starboard shower. The queen size bed might also be a tad tight unless you sleep on your back.

    Mark, you also brought up a good point about minimalism. The boat has a very clean look without headliners and luxurious looking teak. One of the cool results is you can access all the deck hardware (okay, it's cool to us).

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    new plymouth nz
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    yes i like the idea of the hard roof soft sides on the maine cat and would eventually like to create something similiar to improve the comfort and shelter on our open bridgedeck cat. a ply foam sandwich construction would be light and strong, is your roof glass and strong enough to have 2 people up there if you had to access the main?

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    The roof is plenty strong for at least two. I have to go up and unzip the mainsail cover and attach the main halyard.

    The roof is a foam in a fibreglass sandwich perhaps a bit under 2"/5cm thick.

    Here is a picture of Susan in Maine, yes, this was SUMMER!

    Dedicated to staying in touch with her boat insurance clients on an area with poor cell coverage!

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

    Hard at Work 002.jpg
    Last edited by Yoga O; 29th September 2009 at 12:30 AM. Reason: forgot to answer some of the query

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    new plymouth nz
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    thanks for that, looks well supported underneath as well, dave

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Ahhh, the open bridgedeck life

    Thanks for the questions and comments - here's a photo that shows some of the supporting poles. There are 3 other white posts along with another set of the posts you see in the foreground.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

    IMGP1107.jpg

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •