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Thread: MC30

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Cape town
    Posts
    759

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Hi

    I misread it, single line reefing means one line to pull the clew and the foot, ie you can do it without leaving the cockpit.

    I have always found that the UV protection patch always messes up with the shape of the genoa. When I ordered my sails Northsails suggested I use a UV ink instead. I will let you know how it works as it could be an option for you, especially with such a lovely sailing machine.

    Nice Autopilot that they offer, (I am unbiased of course).

    It is probably good you are far away from the build, othewise one can add lots of toys!

    Cheers
    Paul

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Devon, UK
    Posts
    2,793

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Bloody hell Jeff, with all those bits n bobs, it will be 6 months of reading the instructions before you can play
    Sounds really nice and she looks really nice, should sail very well, youv'e just got 6 months of ants in your pants now

  3. #43
    TYRNTLZRDKING Guest

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Thank you Paul.

    Ian, Bloody hell, lots of bits and bobs!

    Should be complete in 6 months, but will have to wait for spring until I can try her out. Hope Dick keeps his word and stores it inside.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Brighton, UK
    Posts
    2,816

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Congratulations on your new baby.

    I am jealous!
    Insanity is continuing to do the same thing and expecting different results

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    S.E. Florida
    Posts
    1,211

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Jeff,

    I see from the spec you only get one ten pound gas bottle? Any additional storage for another?

    Specs do show 2 reef points (for earlier question).

    I like the fact that bottom paint is standard rather than an additional charge like so many others.

    John
    "The floggings will continue until morale improves"!

  6. #46
    TYRNTLZRDKING Guest

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    I am sure I can find a place to store an additional 10 lb
    gas bottle somewhere if needed.
    Lots of storage space under bridgedeck seats.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Devon, UK
    Posts
    2,793

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    I only have 1 gas bottle which is in a sealed locker with it's own drain through the bridgedeck, why do you need 2 unless you are going on a long extended cruise.

    Beer does NOT, I repeat NOT need warming up.

    Gas is only used for the daily cup of tea or coffee or to make bacon sandwiches - Nothing else.

    So why weigh down your boat unnecessarily

    Quote Originally Posted by jkd View Post
    Jeff,

    I see from the spec you only get one ten pound gas bottle? Any additional storage for another?

    John

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Friday Harbor, Wa
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Congrats! Mainecats are great boats and will spoil you so that nothin else will ever be acceptable unless you hit the Mega-Millions and even then, it'll be a custom Mainecat 70 or some such!

    Not that I'm biased either!

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    At the risk of jinxing myself, we have 2 - 10 gallon bottles. Each one lasts around 2 months. We are 3 weeks into our second bottle.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Idaho, USA
    Posts
    189

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Quote Originally Posted by ireaney View Post
    Beer does NOT, I repeat NOT need warming up.

    Gas is only used for the daily cup of tea or coffee or to make bacon sandwiches - Nothing else.

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    S.E. Florida
    Posts
    1,211

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    Quote Originally Posted by ireaney View Post
    I only have 1 gas bottle which is in a sealed locker with it's own drain through the bridgedeck, why do you need 2 unless you are going on a long extended cruise.

    Beer does NOT, I repeat NOT need warming up.

    Gas is only used for the daily cup of tea or coffee or to make bacon sandwiches - Nothing else.

    So why weigh down your boat unnecessarily
    All true. I'm not knocking any one's boat. It just seems that all the specs I can recall seeing usually call for 2 bottles. Heck the Tiki that was just posted here for sale a week or so ago shows a locker for 3.
    I have a couple of 20's (hurricane coverage) for the home grill and it never fails that I end up swapping bottles in the middle of cooking a steak. (maybe its because I know I have a spare so I don't check the weight of the one I'm using very often)
    On the matter of the beer...... Gemini has a propane fridge, so it IS a necessity on that boat!

    If you are going to keep a spare, would it be better to leave it outside? (maybe a rack like the Seawinds have, rather than keep it in a non-vented locker?)

    Don't mind me, I'm just doing 'what ifs' since I can't find my own yet.

    John
    "The floggings will continue until morale improves"!

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Devon, UK
    Posts
    2,793

    Default Re: Maine Cat 30 hull #60

    That's right feel sorry for yourself and very embarrassed, nobody was taking any offense to what you said:.
    I thought at least you would have understood:, that the only reason why you needed gas, if you want to eat go ashore don't faff around on the boat , take loads of ready made sandwiches, crisps, chocolate and beer and cider, what else do you need, don't take women they eat the crisps and chocolate.

    Some of you Yanks are so sensitive

    Quote Originally Posted by jkd View Post
    All true. I'm not knocking any one's boat. It just seems that all the specs I can recall seeing usually call for 2 bottles. Heck the Tiki that was just posted here for sale a week or so ago shows a locker for 3.
    I have a couple of 20's (hurricane coverage) for the home grill and it never fails that I end up swapping bottles in the middle of cooking a steak. (maybe its because I know I have a spare so I don't check the weight of the one I'm using very often)
    On the matter of the beer...... Gemini has a propane fridge, so it IS a necessity on that boat!

    If you are going to keep a spare, would it be better to leave it outside? (maybe a rack like the Seawinds have, rather than keep it in a non-vented locker?)

    Don't mind me, I'm just doing 'what ifs' since I can't find my own yet.

    John

  13. #53

    Default Re: MC30

    Congratulations on your retirement and on placing your order for the M30. Enjoy.

  14. #54
    TYRNTLZRDKING Guest

    Default Re: MC30

    Thanks Dave.
    I highly recommend retirement. I like it.
    Looking forward to beginning my cruiser lifestyle.
    Will be an adventure just getting the new boat home from Maine.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stratford upon Avon, boat Poole
    Posts
    3,383

    Default Re: MC30

    Please excuse my ignorance, but I had no idea where Maine and Michigan are. I just looked them up on Google Earth.

    How are you going to get a boat from one to the other. By lorry, yes. But by water???? I can't see any possible connection between the two on G.Earth!

    Are there extensive very long canals that don't show on screen?

    It also looks to be an enormous distance to do on inland waterways!

    Last edited by dmmbruce; 18th July 2010 at 09:18 PM.
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  16. #56
    TYRNTLZRDKING Guest

    Default Re: MC30

    There is a way.
    Need to head south down the Atlantic coast to the Hudson river.
    Hudson river to Erie Canal, into and across Lake Erie, up the Detroit river, into Lake St. Clair, up the Saint Clair river to home in Saint Clair Michigan. I agree it will be an enormous distance and thru many locks under bridges as low as 15 feet.
    Like I said, should be an adventure.
    Hope I make it.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stratford upon Avon, boat Poole
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    3,383

    Default Re: MC30

    Quote Originally Posted by tyrntlzrdking View Post
    There is a way.
    Need to head south down the Atlantic coast to the Hudson river.
    Hudson river to Erie Canal, into and across Lake Erie, up the Detroit river, into Lake St. Clair, up the Saint Clair river to home in Saint Clair Michigan. I agree it will be an enormous distance and thru many locks with bridges as low as 15 feet.
    Like I said, should be an adventure.
    Hope I make it.

    WOW! I will take the time to try and see it on the screen.

    I'm sure you will make it. But 15ft bridges may be a challenge.

    Does the boat have a built in A-frame or wishbone structure for easy lowering and raising the mast? If not, it would be worth asking for. It would be cheap to make/fit during the build, but tiresome to do later.

    Cheers, and thanks!

    Mike
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  18. #58
    TYRNTLZRDKING Guest

    Default Re: MC30

    Not sure what you mean by A frame or wishbone structure?
    Is there a picture or diagram of it?
    Unstepping and stepping the mast and re-attaching all the rigging will be a real challenge for me as a novice.
    I will also have to build a cradle similar to this......
    DSCF1491.JPGSeawayMarine.JPG
    DSCF1494.JPGSeawayMarine.JPG

  19. #59
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    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stratford upon Avon, boat Poole
    Posts
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    Default Re: MC30

    It looks from your picture as though your mast will have to lower forwards. Presumably to avoid the hard top. I have the same. Whether forwards or backwards you will need a crutch like that, yes. However I suggest you look at other boats to find a simple design that is easy to rig and store.

    I will try to find a picture of an A-frame, or wishbone system. They used to be common on Dutch boats. They have, or had, lots of bridges on their canals so the need for a simple quick system was obvious.

    I will try to explain lowering the mast backwards. Then what you change to lower it forwards if relevant.

    The basic idea is that you have two strong (eg 3"x3") pieces of wood, Bolted to the chain plates low down, that go forward to the middle of the front cross beam. You may add a cross piece, or strong strop, between the middle of these two beams so as to avoid them pushing out sideways when under load. Hence the name A-frame. They then have an eye bolt in the end of each which are joined by a strong shackle. Next, you have a line from a good strong sheet winch coming forward to a block on the cross beam and up to the shackle at the apex of the frame. The inner forestay, or equivalent line that goes up to near the cross-trees, is attached to the shackle on the A-frame. You may need to add a strop so as to get the right length.

    To lower the mast, tighten the line back to the sheet winch, undo the forestay, remove the bottom bolt on the mast tabernacle and slacken the pivot bolt. Pull on a backstay as you slacken the line from the sheet winch. then let the line out slowly so the mast comes down in control. As you do it, the A-frame swings up to the vertical thereby keeping a constant angle for the line on to the mast. This prevents any excessive loads.

    If the bridge is too low for the A-frame, take the legs off the chain plates and put them flat on the deck.

    To raise the mast. Re fix the legs if necessary. Winch in the line that goes from the sheet winch to the bow and up to the apex of the frame. It often helps to get someone to physically lift the mast for the first bit, but this is not strictly necessary. Pull the apex of the frame down to the bow, this gets the mast vertical, refix tabernacle and forestay. Remove the A-frame. Easy!

    It actually is easy with practice and can be done fast.

    To lower the mast forwards, you just have the A-frame pointing backwards. Probably resting it on your bimini/cockpit roof. Then have the fixed pulley that the line goes round, in the middle of the stern. You would also have to preplan a line going up to near the cross-trees, this is easy with a loop round the mast hoisted by a spare halyard (with a down haul of course). You just let the backstays go to lower the mast.

    The reason I said it is easy to include in the build process, is that you might need to reinforce the shroud chain plates so they can take the loads at the angles involved. It helps if the plates are level with the mast as well, as this keeps the geometry of the job at it's best. You also need a secure pulley/block at either the bow or the stern for the line to go round.

    I'm sorry this has has taken ages to explain. I very much hope it is clear, though somehow I doubt it. I have done it often in the past so it is clear in my head. But that does not mean I have communicated it well!

    Please ask as many questions as you like. It is a useful technique.

    Cheers!

    Mike
    Last edited by dmmbruce; 18th July 2010 at 11:45 PM. Reason: Correction
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    683

    Default Re: MC30

    The "beauty" of going the Hudson River/Erie Canal route is hundreds of boats do it every year and each end is well-equipped to quickly and efficiently un-step and step the mast. Granted you will want to have the appropriate support for the mast on your own.

    The other beauty of this route is the route itself. Of course, you might have to make sure you avoid any spring floods!

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

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