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Thread: Buntline or Bowline

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  1. #1
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    Default Buntline or Bowline

    On another thread it was suggested that a Buntline knot was the best thing for attaching a halyard to a sail. Ok, so I have learnt to tie a buntline.

    But, why is a buntline knot better than a bowline which I have always used in the past?

    Any ideas please?

    Mike
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    I've never heard of a buntline and I don't know how to tie one. I know about rabbits, trees and holes though :

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    Quote Originally Posted by ColdFusion View Post
    I've never heard of a buntline and I don't know how to tie one. I know about rabbits, trees and holes though :
    Can I help you?
    http://www.animatedknots.com/buntlin...matedknots.com

    Mike
    (At least I didn't spell it wrongly this time)
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    Quote Originally Posted by dmmbruce View Post
    Thank you kindly

    The website says it's a sod to untie after it's been under load, so why use it instead of a tried and trusted bowline? Or am I missing something?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    I've just noticed an omission on that website. There's no granny knot :

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    Quote Originally Posted by ColdFusion View Post
    I've just noticed an omission on that website. There's no granny knot :
    No problem. We have plenty of 'grannies' here.
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    Quote Originally Posted by ColdFusion View Post
    ...The website says it's a sod to untie after it's been under load, so why use it instead of a tried and trusted bowline? Or am I missing something?
    I just saw an article/picture in one of my recent sailing magazines (it would probably have been Cruising World or Sail, not likely Practical Sailor) which also suggested it for the main halyard instead of the bowline, but it also stated it was extremely difficult to untie after being under a load so be prepared to cut the line!

    The only time I have seen a bowline come undone on its own was the jib sheet on a flogging jib. Since the main halyard wouldn't be flogging, I think I would be comfortable using a bowline.

    Fortunately when I had my running rigging replace two years ago the rigger solved my problems by splicing in an eye on the main halyard. I guess if I reverse the main halyard to prolong the life I will be faced with using the bowline.

    Marshall
    "People sail for fun and no one has yet convinced me that it's more fun to go slow than it is to go fast." -- Dick Newick

  8. #8

    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    I am surprised that nobody knew the answer to this question. Here is the reason you may want to use a buntline hitch. A bowline is a 60% strength knot, where a buntline hitch is a 90% strength knot. This means that if your halyard line has a Safe Working Load of 1000 pounds, tying a bowline degrades the strength of the line to only 600 lbs, where a buntline will hold to 900 lbs. Also, it is much less bulky and less prone to catching on things. The flip side, as explained above several times... a bowline can be untied, and buntline hitch will most likely need to be cut to free your shackle, but so would a spliced eye.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    A figure of eight knot has a lot of strength and can be undone.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Buntline or Bowline

    Quote Originally Posted by catalac08 View Post
    A figure of eight knot has a lot of strength and can be undone.
    Wow this is an old thread (pun intended). Happy 2019 everyone.

    In the absence of a snug splice I have always used a beehive knot, sometimes called a half blood knot for halyard shackles.

    1. It is 95-100%
    2. It doesn't allow the shackle to rotate, preventing wear.
    3. It is a round knot that is hard to snag.
    4. It is relatively compact so doesn't reduce the lift.
    5. It can be tied in older rope that is often very difficult to splice.

    Sure it cannot be undone (ever) but since you would always use it with a shackle this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to cut it off you probably need to do this anyway as chafe away from the knot is the usual cause of replacement.

    Just my 2p's worth.

    Peter

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