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Thread: Maine Cat 36? Dick's pen is going again.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    53

    Default Maine Cat 36? Dick's pen is going again.

    Not sure how far along he is. He's looking for input.
    http://www.mecat.com/blog.php

    My sense is he would love to build a hot rod, didn't the 41 start as a 38 w rotating mast? Anyone ever see the original sailing 38?, the P47 started as a 38. I guess the folks buying these days wanted bigger boats.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Far North Queensland Australia
    Posts
    283

    Default Re: Maine Cat 36? Dick's pen is going again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark424 View Post
    Not sure how far along he is. He's looking for input.
    http://www.mecat.com/blog.php

    My sense is he would love to build a hot rod, didn't the 41 start as a 38 w rotating mast? Anyone ever see the original sailing 38?, the P47 started as a 38. I guess the folks buying these days wanted bigger boats.
    Gooday Mark - - great news - - sure hope they stretch-it a tad - - like 37' to 39'. Gives much better 'sea-kindly' handling abilities. As we all know the nicer (faster only sometimes) we can sail & the more often we can sail (without motors on) especially in light to moderate winds - the more fun we all have.

    It'd be nice if they built-in a 'sugar-scoop' to keep the bum out of the water - when at speed & to keep the weight out of the ends.

    For me - personally - you can keep your diesel smell & taste - out of my breakfast, lunch & dinner & also the smell out of my 'sundowners' - not ever going to happen in a boat I own - been down that road - far to many times. For the 'thrust' they produce & for the weight they are - diesel/ anything is - a very poor end result. IMHO

    Sure hope I can save enough money to get over there - when they start producing them - I'd sure be at the front of the line to go for a test sail. Thanks so much for letting us know. Ciao, james

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Annapolis, MD
    Posts
    709

    Default Re: Maine Cat 36? Dick's pen is going again.

    I think there is a limit to the weight of a cat that can be properly pushed by Yamaha 9.9 HT outboards, which are for several reasons the only good choice for catamarans. It's probably around 10K# , and that will likely keep the boat under 37 feet LOA.
    Thirty six feet on the waterline will provide just sufficient ride for short chop if the bows are slender enough to pierce the waves and wakes, and the sterns are full enough to dampen pitch. Weight will have to be rigorously controlled and kept away from the ends. Visual delights like targa arches must be fore-sworn. The term "rocket ship" should also be avoided to preclude overstimulating the youngsters here.

    I trust Dick Vermeulen to deliver a well thought out and meticulously equipped product, and will likely fall in love with what ever he comes up with, but this is the idea stage, and we would all be proud to see a suggestion here take fruit. Check it out. www.mecat.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Maine Cat 36? Dick's pen is going again.

    Quote Originally Posted by James Val Jackson View Post
    Gooday Mark - - great news - - sure hope they stretch-it a tad - - like 37' to 39'. Gives much better 'sea-kindly' handling abilities.
    If you are going to 39', might as well just buy the exisiting 41, unless you are looking for something more performance oriented at the expense of range and comforts. The trick would be to control the costs so not to price yourself out of the market, I just don't know how big the performance weekender market is at higher price points.

    At the end of the day, it comes down to maximizing the "Grin/$" coefficent. (can I trademark that?) For some the grin comes from a long hot shower at the island, for others it's the acceleration in a puff or down a wave. I love the open, great room, forward view while sailing design. Granted, I've only sat on the 41 at the dock and spent an afternoon sailing the 30, although I'm seriously considering buying a used 30 this winter.

    A 35 with higher performance would be very interesting to me. A couple minor tweaks. The new stiffer acrylic windows are very nice, need to tweak the hard top design to support fastening them flipped up, vs rolled up. The rear "corners" in the seats on the 41 are a nice place to lounge back while facing forward vs the rear bench on the 30 which is exposed and has you leaning on the railings. I'm on autopilot 99% of the time, so like a comfy place to stand watch underway. Longer hulls, more power in the rig, kill the stub keels, improve pointing, don't think you need more living space, perhaps a teeny bit more hull flare above the water line for bit of space in the galley and master berth. Should be able to do that without driving the cost way up.

    Ok, some bigger ideas: How do we increase performance and decrease cost? What are the things that really make a 35' boat more expensive than the MC30? is it one thing we can engineer around, or just lots of little things here and there? Higher upfront engineering and prototyping costs can be spread across many boats. Presumably it all comes down the labor, raw materials, and parts.

    Parts: Is there anything in sailing that is mass-produced and usable off the shelf stock? e.g. we have a little fleet of Open 5.70s dinghies around here that use Hobie masts, much cheaper than smaller volume parts. Is there a catalina, beneteau, or hunter rig that is mass produced and usable stock that would save $ on parts?

    Raw materials/weight: or is it about saving fiberglass and resin....would say a free standing bi-plane rig save tons of structural weight not having a compression loaded mast on the bridge deck? See the Kelsall bi-plane rig. too radical? What about a wing? (more power/weight) should be a few ex AC42 wings laying around at the end of next year!

    Labor: I have no clue where the labor goes and how to reduce those costs. Is there a way to have a simple base boat that is upgradeable over time - or does that just make it real expensive from the start?

    e.g Start with a light weight, low cost 35' version of the 30', over time one can add more systems if the need arises. Turbo charge the rig if performance is your thing? Seems that every designer has to make comprimises between performance and creature comforts. Have a base boat and let the buyer choose, that way a second hand buyer could lighten the systems and turbo charge if performance was their thing, or vice versa. I know it's not that easy....just thinking out loud.

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