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Thread: Sacrificial Keels

  1. #1

    Default Sacrificial Keels

    When I was living on board in Dania, Florida, I saw a Prout 45??? in the boat yard with large pieces of its sacrificial keels ripped away. I talked to the boatyard manager about what had happened to the boat, and he said the Prout hit some rocks somewhere on the east coast damaging the keels, and then he motored to Florida to repair the damage. The thing that really interested me was that this was the second time this particular catamaran had been in the boatyard for repair to the sacrificial keels.

    Although I wasn't too impressed by the owner's seamanship repeatedly hitting rocks/coral, I was impressed that the sacrificial keels had done their job protecting the real bottom of the hulls from serious damage. No water entered the hull interior in either grounding.

    What are the pros and cons of sacrificial keels? Do any of you have them on your multihull?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Sacrificial Keels

    The St Francis has keels that if ripped off, you lose your black water tanks and thats it.So more work than replacing a keel maybe but not vital for survival of the boat.
    Safe Sailing
    Paul
    Blog: www.suliere.com

  3. #3
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    Oct 2008
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    Default Re: Sacrificial Keels

    The Prout owner was lucky,as the main water tanks on the Prout 45/Quasar are in the keels.

    Friends with a sistership thought their drinking water tasty "funny" and then realised that when they hit a rock off Brittany they had cracked their keel. One reason why I now don't recommend water tanks in the keels

    I like a good lump of wood (say 4in x 2in) fitted to the bottom of LAR keels. Sikaflexed (or use 5200) in place and then the ends only glassed over. If you don't do that there is the danger of the sacrificial strips peeling off when they hit things, or even if dried out across an incoming tide. No need to glass the whole length and if you do, you'll not easily be able to replace a damaged one. And don't bolt them on!

    Years ago a S African Sagitta (with LAR keels) broke its mooring and went onto a reef. One keel broke off and the hull was badly damaged. However the crew got the boat home 20 miles unaided as the boat had an inner hull tray which kept the hull afoat.

    The event made national TV in S Africa and apparently the next day the builder was inundated with enquiries from monohull sailors for "that amazing unsinkable boat."

    A small aside, I think these two bottom forums should be moved to above the Boat ones, I keep forgetting to scroll down the whole page to look.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sacrificial Keels

    Quote Originally Posted by Woods Designs View Post
    One reason why I now don't recommend water tanks in the keels



    www.sailingcatamarans.com

    Now he tells me!!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Sacrificial Keels

    What about black water tanks in the keels?
    Safe Sailing
    Paul
    Blog: www.suliere.com

  6. #6
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    Worcester, U.K., Moraira, Spain
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    Default Re: Sacrificial Keels

    What are the pros and cons of sacrificial keels? Do any of you have them on your multihull?
    Doesn't your Privilege have them? The current range does.

  7. #7
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    Default Shoal draft / hurricane anchoring

    For boats to be used in the Tropics between 8 degrees and 25 degrees of latitude, I'd say that there is an extra benefit to be gained from the shoal draft that you can get from daggerboards and raising rudders, and that's the ability to snuggle in with the mangroves in a hurricane. This gives you more shelter, but it also makes it more likely that boats dragging down on you might go aground before they get to you-if the storm surge doesn't rise so high as to eliminate that.
    Currently concentrating on http://earthnurture.com .

  8. #8

    Default Re: Shoal draft / hurricane anchoring

    Quote Originally Posted by BigCat View Post
    For boats to be used in the Tropics between 8 degrees and 25 degrees of latitude, I'd say that there is an extra benefit to be gained from the shoal draft that you can get from daggerboards and raising rudders, and that's the ability to snuggle in with the mangroves in a hurricane. This gives you more shelter, but it also makes it more likely that boats dragging down on you might go aground before they get to you-if the storm surge doesn't rise so high as to eliminate that.
    This is an excellent point. Being able to go where other boats can't go for storm anchoring is a real benefit. For boats staying in the tropics, this would be a major consideration. When I lived in Puerto Rico and had a monohull, I had a saying, "He who anchors last anchors best." Whenever a tropical storm or hurricane came, I was one of the last people to set my anchor because I wanted to position my boat so that others would not drag down on me. The harbor was open to the south east with a long fetch, and I wanted to be windward to all the poorly anchored yachts in the zone of greatest fetch.

    If I could have gotten into the mangroves where other yachts could not have gone, I would have been one of the first to anchor rather than one of the last.

    I had lifting chainplates installed on board Exit Only so if I was ever in the Islands and there were no tenable anchorages in a hurricane, I could hire a crane to lift me out of the water without any straps or even a boatyard.

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