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Thread: hurricane plan on the hard

  1. #1

    Default hurricane plan on the hard

    We just purchased our cat and are trying to make a hurricane plan for the insurance company. She will be on the hard in Florida pretty much until the end of the season when we will head to the Caribbean. I've searched a lot on the internet and have a couple of questions if anyone can help. We are thinking it might not be much more $$ to purchase supplies ourselves rather than rent from the marina even for a one time use.
    I'm thinking 4' helical/cork screw anchors. Any suggestions on where to buy?
    what type and size straps are recommended? I of course want the very best, because she is our new baby, but am thinking 4" ones may be overkill and not fit through the cleats or eye holes on the helical anchor posts. I've read that nylon is better on the hard as it won't stretch as much. Any feedback?
    I haven't found any diagrams or descriptions of where to actually strap the boat. I did read one article that stated to "tie down strap between hulls" rather than just on the end quarters, so it doesn't lift Yikes This of course would influence how many anchors we get and how long the straps should be.

    So sorry for the long post! I am new to the idea of hurricanes and the more I look the more I start to stress.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Home port Chesapeake Bay; Cruising full time.
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    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    Now for something completely different.

    If you plan on heading to the Carib after hurricane season, I strongly suggest you move the boat to N of Cape Hatteras for storm season, e.g., Ches Bay, then head to the Carib offshore in Nov. This would result in safer and cheaper hurricane preps and a MUCH better transit to the Carib. Have you ever done the Thorny Path? That will take a long time, all upwind unless you step stone a day at a time in near upwind. In contrast, from the Ches Bay the Virgins are 7-10 days non-stop. This is a no brainer.

    2 Hulls Dave

  3. #3

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    The boat is on the hard now. We actually close tomorrow. Then have a few things to do while she is out of the water to get her ready to cruise. We figure it will take us till about the end of hurricane season.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Port Canaveral Florida
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    700

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    You're right. In a hurricane land is safer than being in a slip. Holding power is dependent on the type of soil, which could get mushy if there's heavy rainfall in a hurricane. Drilling and fastening to a concrete slab is safer. This is what Sebastian River marina near me used to survive Hurricane Jeanne and Hurricane Francis in 2004. 100% effective.

    Boat US wrote an article on their method

    http://www.boatus.com/hurricanes/ass...prep_guide.pdf

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Tavernier
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    234

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    The Yard I spoke with said they dig a 4'x2' hole and concrete in the screws to be strapped to. They didnt charge that much for it.
    Personaly I think there could be a huge debate on what would be better, moving out of its path to where its leas tlikely to go, anchoring, tying up in a good mangrove creek, etc. Florida is so low and flat and the boat yards Ive seen are less than 10' above sea level, I wonder if there was significant storm surge what would happen, and what would happen when a 16' skiff or any of the tons of debri laying around the avg boat yard, is picked up and thrown into your boat from 100-150mph winds?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Port Canaveral Florida
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    700

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    Quote Originally Posted by HappyEnding View Post
    The Yard I spoke with said they dig a 4'x2' hole and concrete in the screws to be strapped to. They didnt charge that much for it.
    Personaly I think there could be a huge debate on what would be better, moving out of its path to where its leas tlikely to go, anchoring, tying up in a good mangrove creek, etc. Florida is so low and flat and the boat yards Ive seen are less than 10' above sea level, I wonder if there was significant storm surge what would happen, and what would happen when a 16' skiff or any of the tons of debri laying around the avg boat yard, is picked up and thrown into your boat from 100-150mph winds?
    Read that PDF link I posted. That boatyard was flooded. The tie downs were under 3 feet of water at high surge.... no failures.

  7. #7

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    I did see that article, but should have paid better attention to that point on the flood/surge marina. I'm sure there are very few areas in St. Augustine that much of a surge would not be a problem! Thanks for the insight. At this point my plan includes continual prayers until we get off the hard

  8. #8

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    While I was building m boat a cat 5 cyclone looked to be heading straight towards us. I was looking into ways of tying the boat down, but Bob Oram also suggested filling the lockers with water. (Block the drain holes obviously) I reckon I'd get about 10-15 tonnes of water into them.

    Luckily the cyclone changed course so I didn't need to do anything in the end.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa Florida
    Posts
    888

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    Quote Originally Posted by 2hulls View Post
    Now for something completely different.

    If you plan on heading to the Carib after hurricane season, I strongly suggest you move the boat to N of Cape Hatteras for storm season, e.g., Ches Bay, then head to the Carib offshore in Nov. This would result in safer and cheaper hurricane preps and a MUCH better transit to the Carib. Have you ever done the Thorny Path? That will take a long time, all upwind unless you step stone a day at a time in near upwind. In contrast, from the Ches Bay the Virgins are 7-10 days non-stop. This is a no brainer.

    2 Hulls Dave
    no brainer except for extra 1500 miles

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa Florida
    Posts
    888

    Talking Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    Stop freaking out! Odds of a hurricane hitting any given area in Florida are 32:1 in any year

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Port Canaveral Florida
    Posts
    700

    Default Re: hurricane plan on the hard

    Quote Originally Posted by Artambassadors View Post
    I did see that article, but should have paid better attention to that point on the flood/surge marina. I'm sure there are very few areas in St. Augustine that much of a surge would not be a problem! Thanks for the insight. At this point my plan includes continual prayers until we get off the hard
    We were hit by 4 Hurricanes that year with two of them taking the almost exact track. Those two hurricanes pounded us back to the stone age. I live in a metropolitan area and between those storms we didn't have electricity for two weeks. Rural areas were without electricity for over a month.

    Only wrote this to lend authenticity to that article as I know that particular marina and it was hit very hard, as it was in the NE quadrant of the hurricane (as we all were).

    For those who don't live in a heavy hurricane zone, a sailboat can not escape a storm, nor always be successful in avoiding one. As good as our predictions are, there's enough error in hurricane path predictions that a sail boat is always in the danger zone.

    I motor at 6 knots with a max speed of 6.5 knots with a clean bottom and clean props. That's a possible range of 144 miles in 24 hours. Not enough.. as no one knows the actual path a hurricane will take. Also, when moving in inland areas (intracoastal in Florida) neither bridges nor locks open in darkness. You're stuck.

    I tried this in 2005 with hurricane Katrina. I listened to the predicted path and decided to move my boat to a safe area. They were wrong and we spent two harrowing days on the boat, under way ... in a hurricane.
    Last edited by Tropic Cat; 1st August 2014 at 11:55 AM.

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