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Thread: Stripping boat coats

  1. #1

    Default Stripping boat coats

    My 2002 Voyage 440 was in charter at the BVI Voyage Charter company, and the bottom paint has a rubbery layer under the outer black hard layer. I need to strip down to gelcoat to apply CoppeCoat, but abrasive blasting bounces off the rubber layer. I will be trying Aqua Strip to remove the paint, has anyone had luck with this product or any other bottom paint stripping techniques?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Stripping boat coats

    Quote Originally Posted by Parker View Post
    My 2002 Voyage 440 was in charter at the BVI Voyage Charter company, and the bottom paint has a rubbery layer under the outer black hard layer. I need to strip down to gelcoat to apply CoppeCoat, but abrasive blasting bounces off the rubber layer. I will be trying Aqua Strip to remove the paint, has anyone had luck with this product or any other bottom paint stripping techniques?
    My advice DON'T DO IT. IMHO Coppercoat/bot is rubbish, it should be renamed exercise not antifouling. Ask anyone that has used it and I guarantee they will go on about cleaning it every month or so. Those that haven't alreading painted over it. I have used it and it did not work 18 months "maybe" but with continual scrapping, 3 months then 2 months then 1 month. Sure the barnacles come of easy but with a good anti fouling paint they don't stick there in the first place. When it starts to erode as it is supposed to the surface begins to look like the moon. See comment about removal below.

    What you have sounds like Coaltar Epoxy. This is an excellent barrier coat, undercoat. Many big ships use it. It works very well on flexible hulls like multihulls as it moves with the flexing rather than cracking. Once down to this then applying a good anitfoul is very straight forward and will give you much better "anti" fouling than what you are proposing. Dilunet will get the old antifouling off.

    There is only one way to remove coal tar epoxy and that is by wet sanding an expensive labour intensive and highly anti social process. The same process that is required to remove copper *()$ once you find it doesn't work.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Stripping boat coats

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter View Post
    It works very well on flexible hulls like multihulls as it moves with the flexing rather than cracking.
    I've never seen a multihull whose hull flexes (any more than a mono's). The boat in whole, yes, to some degree, but the hulls themselves? I would be very worried to have hulls that flexed.

    Mark
    Mark Cole
    Manta 40 "Reach"
    www.svreach.com

  4. #4

    Default Re: Stripping boat coats

    The skins of sandwich construction be it foam or balsa will flex to absorb impacts. The original polyester or epoxy skin will flex but brittle epoxy coatings will crack.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    currently Columbia/Panama
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    Default Re: Stripping boat coats

    But that isn't any different for a multi than a mono. And after a below water impact, cracked bottom coating is probably a minor concern.

    Mark
    Mark Cole
    Manta 40 "Reach"
    www.svreach.com

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