PDA

View Full Version : real-life (small) safety issues



tcm
2nd September 2009, 11:49 PM
We all have fire extinguishers, drogues, lifejackets, flares and yada yada ya... but most of the actual acccidents at sea aren't people getting flung off the boat, engulfed in fire and so on. You and you crew are MUCH more likely to have small accidents, not big ones.

This means a bit of nannying-sounding precautions! I get my lot to pour tea/coffee into cups placd down in a sink so that any spillage is in the sink not on them. No running allowed. Keep indoor floors dry. Walk in shoes or bare feet, never in socks. Take great care with electric winches - a friend wife had her hand mangled in one. Never wrap a rope around your hand before pulling.

What others?

mikereed100
3rd September 2009, 12:51 AM
We all know this from watching cartoons, but never stand on a coil of line that you are about to release. Never use one of those sharp fid thingies used for untying knots to untie a knot, unless you can spare the blood (vise grips/leatherman works better)

Capt. Terry
3rd September 2009, 03:10 AM
Don't talk to strangers. Don't ever eat candy you find already opened. Look both ways before crossing the street. Always wear a rubber. (the rain coat, you perverts!) Buckle your seatbelt. Don't drink and drive. Be home by 10pm or call ahead. Always have mad money and your cell phone with you. Sit in the aisle seats. (bus, boat, and plane) Say your prayers everynight, ESPECIALLY, when you don't feel like it! Don't leave the gate/door open. Lock your car/boat/plane/bike. Take your keys first! Keep medicines labeled. If it smells bad it's probably old, don't eat it! Don't eat yellow snow. Buy gas BEFORE the light comes on. Get your vaccines before the flu season gets here. Tie your shoes. Wear a belt. Be nice. Don't fight. Help somebody. Help somebody you don't like! Give up your seat to someone older than you. Or a lady! Stop when it's yellow!
I could actually spend the rest of my life filling up this blog! So many of life's lessons learned! Oh, were you meaning as it relates to a boat? Sorry! Never mind then, belay my last! Capt. Terry

SteveH
3rd September 2009, 08:48 AM
Always put the warp around a mooring cleat when berthing - you can't pull the boat in against the wind!

Talbot
3rd September 2009, 09:36 AM
Close all hatches and windows before changing course to close hauled.

Dont rely on normal pegs to hold clothes when hanging out to dry.

Wind strength is always inversely proportional to security of sun hats on the head.

You never need to check the chart at sea for the course, just check the wind direction, it is "always" directly upwind :rolleyes:

multihullsailor6
3rd September 2009, 02:52 PM
When leaving the dock always coil your ropes and tie them with a loop / knot so they don't drag and get pulled into your prop. It also helps to store them soonest!:o

IreAneY
5th September 2009, 09:44 AM
Never take the mother-in-law on board:D

multihullsailor6
5th September 2009, 11:12 AM
Never take the mother-in-law on board:D

Ian, care to comment on your above statement, please!

From personal experience I can only say that my mother-in-law was well behaved when sailing with us, no make that to read being sailed by us, she did what we told her to do. On the other hand my father-in-law, himself an owner and licenced skipper of a small inshore trailerable motorised fishing boat, managed to dump the aft shoreline into the water when leaving the fuel jetty, with the nearly instant result of a red-faced skipper (me:mad:) when the prop didn't turn any more and we needed to call in the divers.

When leaving the fuel jetty for the second time that morning my father-in-law was strangely absent on deck!:o

Talbot
5th September 2009, 02:46 PM
Money spent on decent fenders is rarely wasted

Learning how to sail on and off moorings, onto and off jetties, and to pick up a MOB is great in case that is the only system you have available, but it is invariably faster and easier to use your engines!

IreAneY
5th September 2009, 05:48 PM
I think it goes back to the tradition of the 'Mother In Law' jokes and how they like to tell their Son In Laws what to do so as to protect their precious daughters.

From my experience, my first mother in law would have been too scared to set foot on anything smaller than the QE2 and if so would have winged and moaned all the time, my second and current MIL is lovely and generous but a little large, 22 stoneish :eek: so weight and boat trim would be more difficult than usual.:o

I hope you realise that I may have to delete this post in case it gets read by my better half, although she would agree with me ;)


Ian, care to comment on your above statement, please!

From personal experience I can only say that my mother-in-law was well behaved when sailing with us, no make that to read being sailed by us, she did what we told her to do. On the other hand my father-in-law, himself an owner and licenced skipper of a small inshore trailerable motorised fishing boat, managed to dump the aft shoreline into the water when leaving the fuel jetty, with the nearly instant result of a red-faced skipper (me:mad:) when the prop didn't turn any more and we needed to call in the divers.

When leaving the fuel jetty for the second time that morning my father-in-law was strangely absent on deck!:o

BigCat
7th September 2009, 03:22 AM
Don't talk to strangers. Don't ever eat candy you find already opened. Look both ways before crossing

And of course, never run with scissors. There was a fellow who named his catamaran "Running with Scissors." As I recall, it came apart at a daggerboard trunk, and while it didn't quite sink, what floated was very badly damaged.