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multihullsailor6
11th September 2009, 01:41 PM
I need to buy new lifelines - am planning to go for the 3 hook version. However have this question:

What are your experiences with lifelines - fixed length versus expanding length?

Yoga O
11th September 2009, 02:31 PM
Sorry, don't know the 3 hook version. We have always had the "standard" wire lifelines. Our current boat has a closed turnbuckle and pelican style shackles.

Of course, now that we are sailing on the level, the only thing we use the lifelines for is hanging the laundry out.;)

Fair Winds,
Mike

Tabs
11th September 2009, 02:40 PM
I think Roger is refering to harness lifelines, not guardrails!

Yoga O
11th September 2009, 03:21 PM
D'oh! Why can't you guys speak American, cuz I'm too lazy to learn english!:D

IreAneY
11th September 2009, 03:43 PM
I have a combination of all three for myself (1 elastic with 2 ends, 1 with 3 hooks and 1 non-elastic with 2 ends plus 4 sets of straight 1 metre length with a gib hook at each end for guests.

If the jackstays go from the edge of saloon top to the base of the of the mast, I dont think it really matters as if you fall, because you are therefore so near the centre (instead of having the jackstays down the tops of the hulls) you won't go over the side, I therefore would prefer the elastic one to use.

SteveH
11th September 2009, 04:52 PM
I prefer the elastic ones because there is less to trip over but the hooks need to be easy to use. We have some we brought for the kids but they are too tight for them to open and even for us they are tricky and can pinch your fingers.
The other thing I have noticed is that some we have are a bit too small to fit over the webbing jackstays and can be difficult to attach or remove. We have quite thick webbing which doesn't bend very easily.

Illusion_Reality
17th November 2009, 01:20 PM
In one those thoughts of "I can make that cheaper", I built a couple harness tethers for my wife and myself. I copied the commercial versions exactly http://www.wichard-usa.com/Safety%20Products/Safety%20Products.htm
item 7007. I used bungee cord inside tubular nylon webbing with wichard fittings. Hand sewn using a sewing palm and heavy gauge needle. They ended up being about half price new ones and I trust them the same as new ones. So it worked out.
Mike

Talbot
17th November 2009, 02:24 PM
Not a fan of normal carbine hooks on a safety line. I believe that this should be a double action hook.

Being able to make up this sort of gear is a good reason to have a good sewing machine (sailrite) as you are then much more likely to replace the webbing and the actual sewed section before it degrades under UV.

The same for the Jackstays.

Illusion_Reality
17th November 2009, 03:17 PM
The big end of the 7007 is double action, you have to squeeze the yellow handle in prior to the clasp opening. The other end is of course a snap shackle.
I would love to have a sailrite machine.
The cost and weight is just ......OUCH.
Mike

Illusion_Reality
17th November 2009, 03:31 PM
Webb jacklines can be tied using a water knot vise carabiners. I would think it has to be a stronger, pulling on itself and not threads. Not as convenient, but we found the carabiner wouldn't pull through the forward attachment point, for the round trip back to the cockpit.
http://www.animatedknots.com/waterknot/index.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com
Not quite the same, the red line would be end returning from the attachment point.
Mike

Talbot
17th November 2009, 04:00 PM
The big end of the 7007 is double action, you have to squeeze the yellow handle in prior to the clasp opening. The other end is of course a snap shackle.

Why "of course" - I reckon it is much better/safer to have double action hooks on both ends.

dmmbruce
17th November 2009, 06:33 PM
I think the OP was asking about 3 point lines as well. I certainly prefer these with the two sides NOT of equal length. For a small person perhaps 0.75m and 1.5m. For a larger person, and/or if your 'D' rings or other fixing points are well spaced, perhaps 1m and 2m.

I don't trust jack stays that your harness can slide along. If you are hit by a wave, or the sail, you can slide down the thing which is thoroughly dangerous.

Cheers. Mike

Illusion_Reality
18th November 2009, 01:59 PM
"Of Course" you could use 4 point harness and foot straps. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YF_6gPlbf54&feature=related
Or duct tape to the mast.
Mike