Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 33 of 33

Thread: Rotating mast .....

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Home port Chesapeake Bay; Cruising full time.
    Posts
    1,588

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Sorry I'm late to this discussion. Seem smost of the points have been made, except one:

    Quote Originally Posted by djeeke View Post
    2) Sails can be raised, reefed, or stowed without changing course. This is particularly important when sailing downwind, because you do not have to turn the boat first broadside to the weather, and then into the wind in order to change sail. You hold course and just let the rig weathervane while you do what needs to be done;
    I don't understand why reefing would be easier on a rotator vs non-rotator, other than minimizing the angle between the sail and mast when downwind.

    I routinely reef and un-reef deep downwind with no problem. Sure, it's a bit easier when not deep downwind, but it's still no problem. You just need good mainsail track cars. I have Harken batt cars, but other good quality cars work just as well or better.

    But for a cruiser who occasionaly races, a non-rotator has huge advantages. Keep in mind >> if you DO race and want a rotator, the handicap rating will screen this out and it'll cost you BIG time on corrected time. That Lagoon 380 just might will kick yer ass...

    2 Hulls Dave

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Millbrook Cornwall UK
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    The advantage of a rotating mast when reefing the main is that the battens are at a right angle to the batten car. This means that the load is shared by both sides of the car using all the balls or rollers. A fixed mast, once the batten is pressing on one side as with sailing deep tends to twist the car on the track. Big roach mainsails tend to cause the most problems.

    The handicap is there to allow fair racing, if we are beaten by a fixed mast boat we haven't sailed as well. The old ORMA fleet and the present IRTA boats seem to have both fixed masts and rotators so I guess its not a vital choice. My rotator just makes me feel safer when cruising downwind singlehanded.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Hi,

    Does anybody have a photo or picture of shock absorbers for lee stays?

  4. #24

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy Daugherty View Post
    Count me sitting on the fence, directing traffic. By "extra strings to pull" I'm referring to exactly that. Compare a charter cat to a racing machine; the main on a charter boat has a main sheet, halyard and out haul for controls. As the performance requirements increase, you add luff tension, vang, cunningham, and spend a lot of time tweaking the batten tension. Then there's back stay tension for mast bend, and running back stays. More strings to pull, and some of them require their own winches, hydraulics, kickers, etc. If the mast rotates, winches may be required to control it, meaning a dedicated crew member just for that purpose in a tacking duel. But wait! that's not cruising! No extra crew, no tacking duels! No extra winches (they each represent a couple months in the cruising kitty.)

    I doubt a rotating mast contributes a 10% increase in the power of the main, and it compromises the power of a genny cut for roller furling. Come to think of it, a racer would not have a genoa on a roller furler!

    My position is this: a rotating mast is for a boat with a very strong slant toward the performance end of the spectrum, and that is why they are found on so few catamarans. They are an enormous expense for damn little gain, they are a continuing expense after the initial investment, and they add to the confusion and mayhem in a crisis. To much for a single person to deal with on a cold, wet night watch.
    Have you ever sailed on a boat with a rotating mast? I have, and it was none of the hassles you mention. Tacking, the mast could be left to "tack" itself. Just leave the control lines set at the right length.

    And, for cruising, night sailing, sailing short handed, or if it all just became too much hassle, the mast could simply be left locked in the centre position.

    Expense wise - certainly a carbon wingmast is very expensive. But you can also have a rotating rig using a standard aluminium mast section. The rotating spanner is a slight extra cost, but not much, and the mast base might be a little more expensive, but again not hugely so.

    Your post is reminiscent of some of the anti-daggerboard arguments I've read. Too many ropes, too much hassle etc. But there's always the option of simply leaving them 1/2 way down.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    currently Columbia/Panama
    Posts
    355

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Quote Originally Posted by 44C View Post
    Have you ever sailed on a boat with a rotating mast? I have, and it was none of the hassles you mention. Tacking, the mast could be left to "tack" itself. Just leave the control lines set at the right length.
    I have sailed on pure all-out racing boats with rotating masts and professional crews. This is how they handle it.

    Mark
    Mark Cole
    Manta 40 "Reach"
    www.svreach.com

  6. #26

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    I have a rotating mast on my Corsair 31. I have the rotation options of leaving the mast centered, allowing it to fair itself, or I can position it where I want it. Combined with a wing shaped mast section, the rotating feature is "worth" more than 10% increase in speed/power. Other than a visual inspection at mast raising, no maintenance issues at all. To further complicate the mast features, my mast also cants. To some, this would seem like a lot of variables, but again, the mast canting feature can be centered and left that way. The standing rigging is simplistic- forestay and two sidestays (diamond stays on mast are set and forget).

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stratford upon Avon
    Posts
    3,412

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Quote Originally Posted by oreana123 View Post
    I have a rotating mast on my Corsair 31. I have the rotation options of leaving the mast centered, allowing it to fair itself, or I can position it where I want it. Combined with a wing shaped mast section, the rotating feature is "worth" more than 10% increase in speed/power. Other than a visual inspection at mast raising, no maintenance issues at all. To further complicate the mast features, my mast also cants. To some, this would seem like a lot of variables, but again, the mast canting feature can be centered and left that way. The standing rigging is simplistic- forestay and two sidestays (diamond stays on mast are set and forget).
    Hello oreana123 and welcome. How does you canting mast work? do you have a block and tackle on each of the side stays and adjust them each tack?

    Mike
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    My Corsair 24 MkII had a rotating mast and it was canted as well. I don't remember having to ever adjust the cant regardless of my point of sail. It was easy to reef as the cars never jammed in the mast. If kept well lubricate, it worked flawlessly. I also had a roller furling boom to make reefing even easier.

    If I had the choice between boats, I would select the one with a rotating mast.

    FYI, Mine had a windvane and steam light or deck light and the rotation had no effect on those items.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cornwall UK
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Are you sure your Corsair mast canted (Sideways)? How did this work without adjustment? Are you thinking of rake (Fore and aft)?

  10. #30

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Tabs,

    I stand corrected. My mast was "raked" aft. Sorry for the confusion in terms.

  11. #31

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    OK when I say canting mast I mean just that- a mast that can be adjusted sideways. I have 2 tackles on each side with a 16:1 advantage that adjust this feature on my rig. There is a loop of 1/2 inch dyneema at the sidestay/upper block and tackle area that limits maximum travel. Again, this adjustment can be left centered, if it is too much for the number of crew. Or, the mast can be placed "uphill" to present more sail area to the wind. Conversely, the rig can be depowered by letting the rig down. One additional effect of moving the rig up is to make the center hull carry more of the press of the sails, allowing the downwind float to surface. Another possible benefit of this set up is to allow the sail set to hang better in extremely light air, by letting the mast down and using gravity to help shape the sails instead of slatting.

    If we are carrying enough crew to use the canting mast racing around the buoys, the clutches in the aft cockpit are released allowing the mast to go down hill at the command of "ready about", then locked again anticipating that the mast will be uphill after the tack. Just like the traveler is often let down for the same reason.

    As to the benefit of a rotating mast: I sailed on Lake Tahoe in August, single handed and in less than 10 knots of wind. I was repositioning the boat to a marina and just cruising at 6 knots, indicated on the GPS chartplotter. I noticed that the mast was locked in the center of rotation, so I released the mast rotator line jam cleat, the mast rotated to its own position, and the boat speed increased to 8 knots on the GPS, with no other adjustments.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stratford upon Avon
    Posts
    3,412

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Interesting. It sounds too complicated for cruising but I suppose good for fully crewed racers.

    That increase in speed when you released the mast is amazing. Far more than I would have expected from my position of ignorance.

    Mike
    Nothing works on an old boat, except the skipper.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Rotating mast .....

    Hi all,

    i just became a owner of a HT26 mk IV and was following this thread, i have sailed beach cats all my life, and a rotating mast is default there.
    They seem very simple and as u tack the mast is tuned in the right direction by the force of the sail, it gives a better profile and u dont need extra lines.

    If not for windmeters and stuff i would always want it on a boat, even if it just helps 5%, im convinced the price diffeence is non existent as the technique is not very special

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •